George says...


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Posted by Charles on April 13, 1999 at 00:52:26:

In Reply to: There is no one else to blame but yourselves posted by Roger Earl on April 11, 1999 at 12:30:45:

You are correct, Roger. Animation artists are to blame. We should have started getting ourselves together a long, long time ago. We should have been much more organized. We should never have allowed the Union to include a "no strike" clause in its contract and we should have been starting our own studios long before Dreamworks TV closed down.

And speaking of Dreamworks TV, do you think that the animation artists who were working there are to blame for its demise? I know several artists who were telling me 2 years ago about the problems the studio was having. They tried and tried but got nowhere with management. Is it the artists' fault that the studio couldn't make a go of it? Is it their fault that their closed minded, insecure, demogogic superiors wouldn't listen?

And how about the item I reported on this message board on April 5. Are the artists to blame for the execs adding a few hundred thousand dollars for themselves onto a budget for no reason other than being execs, thus prompting the potential client to send the entire production to another country?

In the latest issue of Premiere Magazine, in an interview with George Lucas, on page 76, he makes the following statement:

"The real issue is that the studios were taken over by corporations. The culture of a corporation is to grow a middle management: By its very nature, it's a lot of people who don't know what they're doing. They maybe go to Harvard Business School and then suddenly find themselves trying to make movies. They don't have the vaguest idea of what they're doing or why. So they hire an assistant, or another vice-president, to do that part of it, somebody else who doesn't know what they're doing."

Although Mr. Lucas is talking about live action, anyone who has spent even a short amount of time in animation can see the parallel.

By the way, did you happen to hear about the lawsuit that the Disney Company recently lost? A court ordered them to pay $9.3 million for failing to adequately promote and merchandise the comic book character "Marsupilami". Among the reasons sighted in the case, they used inexperienced executives who bungled the campaign. (Animation Blast News, March 27, 1999).

As far as the April 1 meeting being "nothing but B.S.", I can tell by your comment that you obviously weren't there. As a courtesy, I'll briefly inform you that the meeting did more to bring animation artists together than any singular event in our recent history, the ramifications of which are already being felt in many significant ways and will continue to grow as the word and our ideas spread throughout our community.


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