animationnation mission statementunited we brandanimationnation facebook
  • If you can dream it, you can do it. -Walt Disney

  • Quality is a great business plan. -John Lasseter

  • Let's make some funny pictures. -Tex Avery

  • I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend. -Howard Zinn

  • When critics sit in judgment it is hard to tell where justice leaves off and vengeance begins. -Chuck Jones

  • And what do you benefit if you gain the whole world but lose your own soul? -Jesus

  • A man should never neglect his family for business. -Walt Disney

  • What's most important in animation is the emotions and the ideas being portrayed. -Ralph Bakshi

  • Once you have heard a strange audience burst into laughter at a film you directed, you realize what the word joy is all about. -Chuck Jones

  • Before enlightenment: chop wood, carry water. After enlightenment: chop wood, carry water. -Buddhist Proverb

Digital Domain Freelancers Face Lawsuits...Must Return Pay

Share your views on the state of the Animation Industry.

Digital Domain Freelancers Face Lawsuits...Must Return Pay

Postby Greg B » Fri Mar 22, 2013 8:32 pm

http://variety.com/2013/vertical/news/lawyers-to-laid-off-digital-domain-freelancers-pay-us-or-well-sue-1200194391/

You have got to be kidding me! The company files for bankruptcy and lawyers want freelancers to return pay they had received.

The animation biz just got so creepy it makes self production far more appealing.
Greg B
 
Posts: 355
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:57 am
Location: Earth

Re: Digital Domain Freelancers Face Lawsuits...Must Return P

Postby SNAKEBITE » Sat Mar 23, 2013 7:08 pm

That makes no sense. Non of it...I guess thats a prerequisite for crooked behavior...all back by "law"...right...
User avatar
SNAKEBITE
 
Posts: 973
Joined: Thu May 13, 2010 5:43 pm
Location: LA

Re: Digital Domain Freelancers Face Lawsuits...Must Return P

Postby Charles » Sun Mar 24, 2013 6:50 pm

Thanks for the heads up on this Greg. Yes indeed I agree. Another anecdote on why it increasingly sucks to work within the corporate executive based animation structure. Glad I'm not in that world any more.

While on that subject here's another oldy but goody...

----------------

http://www.animationnation.com/original ... -mystique-

Destroying The Executive Mystique
Published February 28 1999 on AnimationNation.com

Let's pretend for a moment, shall we?

Let's pretend that there's been this epiphanious experience of religiosity, and that a great rapture has taken all the animation executives in Los Angeles up to the sky. Let me ask you, who would miss them?

Now let's pretend that the same thing has happened to the animation artists and the executives and their management support staffs were left behind. What now? Are they all of a sudden going to pick up some pencils and start designing characters?

Are they going to get emergency training programs started to get production quality artists ready to take everyone's place? Of course not. They wouldn't have a single clue as to how to go about it. It would take a generation to get the kids of today prepared just to begin approaching what is going on now in American animation.

With us on the other hand, the industry would go on and would be the better for it.

Consider the following. When an industry traditionally goes out on strike, management rolls up their sleeves and jumps in to man the stations until enough scabs can be drummed up and trained to take the place of the union. American animation management would not be even remotely able to do any such thing. Being pseudo producers, their only course of action would be to send their pre-production drawings overseas and let a foreign studio work out the problems as has always been the case. Without American animation talent, what are you going to do about illustrating the script? Translate it and send it to a foreign country for design? Makes perfect sense, doesn't it? What a great method of preparation for the theme parks of tomorrow.

Let's imagine once again, that the rapture that has scooped up these sharp shooting geniuses has caught the attention of the highest levels of the entertainment and high finance industries? Would there be a panic? Would the economy come to a crashing halt?

Now let's imagine that the same has happened with our community. What do you think it would do to those companies who have international marketing and real estate empires based upon what goes on in little ol' Burbank, California?

An organ grinder's monkey can be trained to do what our animation executives do with such grand spectacle and preening, and probably do a better job.

This executive class that scours the animation landscape from their unapproachable ivory tower, erected to hide the truth about their lack of professionalism, their commitment to mediocrity, their ignorance of the subject, their creative confusion, their apathy, dishonesty and stupidity.

The American Animation Industry doesn't need to worship the ground these people walk on. In fact, our industry doesn't need them at all. Any one of us can do what these above the line, below the average MBAs can do.

We can do a much better job at production and studio management than they've been doing and it would be so natural for us. We don't need to enroll in night school or take a university course. All we have to do is go to a book store and read the very material they pass out in college. If these executives can learn how to do it, I'm sure it can't be that difficult.

Big budgets? Use the same software that they do. Techniques of business and production management? No problem. We'd wind up teaching them.

In fact, a creative age in animation would be initiated that would turn the Second Golden Age into a Renaissance for our country and our popular culture.

In order for the American Animation Industry to rise to the new heights that await us, to enter the new era, our community has to reach a mental level of seeing ourselves as equal to or better than any non-creative, non-artistic peudo-producer as far as our ability to do what he or she can do, and not be wooed into mental submission to them by the glittery gift wrap around their empty box.

Charles Zembillas © 1999
No commercial distribution of this material is permitted without the expressed written consent of the author.
_________________________________

Daily Z

Image
User avatar
Charles
 
Posts: 7438
Joined: Thu May 13, 2010 5:36 pm

Re: Digital Domain Freelancers Face Lawsuits...Must Return P

Postby Greg B » Sun Mar 24, 2013 8:50 pm

Charles, this is typical of what I call "The User Model". It's not new to the way government and industry operates. Happened in WWI when soldiers were promised benefits but the U.S. welched and then fired on the same troops that won that war when they protested. Same going on today with our troops.

In industry we see it too. They promise you all sorts of stuff and then pull the rug out from under you like IBM did to its workers.

The legislative branch of our government is responsible to a great degree and has become our own worse enemy.
Greg B
 
Posts: 355
Joined: Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:57 am
Location: Earth

Re: Digital Domain Freelancers Face Lawsuits...Must Return P

Postby SNAKEBITE » Sun Mar 24, 2013 9:48 pm

It doesn't surprise me because it happens in micro levels all the time. Especially in the art business. People turn on each, don't honor their agreements. I can't help to think that what we put our faith in whether its money, politics or spirituality has a lot to do with how we treat others.

I've experienced it first hand. Not a lot of people who will have your back either. This echoes my problem with the "business" of matters. It seems people have lost touch with the compassion element. I still have faith it exists though. I see it in other places.

Have faith in yourself then you can truly participate with others.
User avatar
SNAKEBITE
 
Posts: 973
Joined: Thu May 13, 2010 5:43 pm
Location: LA


Return to General Discussion