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» AnimationNation   » General Discussion   » Berny Wolf (1911-2006)

   
Author Topic: Berny Wolf (1911-2006)
bigshot
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Member # 1024

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I just received the sad news that veteran animator, Berny Wolf passed away a few days ago. I'm working on a post about him for the ASIFA-Hollywood Animation Archive. I'll be adding to it tomorrow.

Biography: Berny Wolf (1911-2006)

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Scott Shaw!
IE # 132
Member # 172

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Dang. Just the other day, Mark Evanier and I were wondering if Berny ws still around.

I worked with Berny quite a bit at Hanna-Barbera and Film Roman, and liked him very much. Having worked on animating Jiminey Cricket in Disney's PINNOCCHIO, Berny always seemed to be much younger than his experience would indicate. Also, no matter what project he was overseeing for one of the studios, he always had some sort of personal moneymaking project underway, which often included a new invention he'd have created. (I wound up being drafted into helping Berny on of few of these schemes.)

I hadn't seen Berny in a few years, but I hope his last days were fairly pleasant. He was one of the good 'uns.

Aloha,

Scott!

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bigshot
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I just added scans of some Iwerks model sheets Berny designed along with Grim Natwick, and a Quicktime of Fleischer's Minnie the Moocher with Berny's animation of the ghostly walrus.

See ya
Steve
ASIFA-Hollywood Animation Archive

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Ben Burgess
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Berny Wolf had his back corner office on the second floor of the 'Animedia Building' located in Toluca Lake on Riverside Drive and Forman Ave., during the early 80's.

I used to live on the next street which was Sancola Avenue. One day I noticed the name 'Animedia Building' on the corner of Forman Ave. and read the marquee inside that listed 'Animedia' room #. A secretary (his wife) was in the office and we set up an appointment for me to see this guy, Berny Wolf. I got to meet him.

He looked like, Donald Pleasants with a good sun tan, somewhat and very business like wearing nice cloths. He claimed 'Animedia' did do animation for titles and other projects. And, he was in some current spat with some freelance animator who wanted to charge a FOOTAGE RATE FOR HOW MANY TIMES the CYCLE ANIMATION was REPEATED.
He talked about Walt Disney and the 'Penthouse Club' for the staff animators there during the 40's. He talked about his work on 'Pinocchio' (Jiminy Cricket) and 'Dumbo' (circus clowns).

At this time I was working a Disney and freelancing was always do-able for the weekends at home. But, nothing come up with Berny even meeting with him several other times.

Soon after the meeting I went to the animation morgue. This place was located in the basement of the Ink and Paint Building on the Disney main lot and got the 'Pinocchio' animation draft log. It listed all the sequence/scenes and names of the animators and FX animators and layout Directors and Sequence Directors. There, Berny Wolf, listed as animator of a number of scenes. A number of really classic scenes like Jiminy Cricket on a seahorse during the underwater sequence. And, just like he said!

One of the 'cool' aspects of traditional animation in those days, there was always TV animation work to freelance. It was very time consuming with deadline pressure to deal with in the final outcome. But, it was pin money.

On the other hand there were still the old timers out there who were still working with you. Berny is still a favorite animator of mine, now somewhere up there in the sky. [Wink]

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[IMG] http://www.creativeheads.net/jsmedia.aspx?j=fccfc9010e&spi=0&mid=5163&direct=1[/IMG][/URL]

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bronnie
IE # 93
Member # 25

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Twenty-plus years ago,I took a a boarding class Burny was offering at H-B. A year or two later,I got to pick up some freelance on a commercial Burny was animating for Circuit City! It's been ages, so I don't recall how we were re-introduced; probably by referral. I do remember that when I dropped off the work, I met him and his wife for lunch and had a lovely afternoon!
Both were charming!
I hadn't seen him in a very long time, and I'm so sorry to hear of his passing.

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I am not young enough to know everything- Oscar Wilde

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bigshot
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Thanks for the ID on the Jiminy on the seahorse scene, Ben. I have a drawing from that scene in the current Exhibit of Disney Drawings at the ASIFA-Hollywood Animation Archive, and I didn't know that it was by Berny. I've also got a drawing in the exhibit by Les Clark from Frolicking Fish that inspired the scene in Pinocchio. I'll add the credit to Berny's drawing.

Stephen Worth
Director
ASIFA-Hollywood Animation Archive

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Avar
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Oh no! That's terrible to hear. He will be missed.
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bigshot
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Member # 1024

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I added the Jimminy to the write up. Thanks! Steve

Berny Wolf (1911-2006)

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Mr. Fun
IE # 63
Member # 352

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I had the opportunity to work for Berny a number of times during my career. I was always struck by his no nonsense approach to the animation business. Berny had done great stuff at Disney in the forties, but he knew that a lot of the television stuff was pretty much just a way of earning a paycheck.

He was one of the easiest producers I ever worked for because he didn't buy into the "bull" that was prevalent in the business at the time. He knew what was important -- and what wasn't. He helped shape a lot of my thinking about animation today.

One of the "Great Old Guys," I wish I had worked for more people with the knowledge and experience of Berny Wolf.

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