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» AnimationNation   » General Discussion   » Why do we take orders from people who can't draw? (Page 1)

 
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Author Topic: Why do we take orders from people who can't draw?
Charles
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I was interviewed recently by a student who is writing a paper for her university class, her subject of choice being the AnimationNation movement, what it's meant to the industry and what we're trying to achieve. She was motivated by attending a couple of AN Nights and the experience influenced her in that regard.

During the interview, I made an observation that struck the both of us as ironic and unusual. It's a thought I've come to realize and sharing it with her was a first.

Consider the studio executives, the Animation Guild, ASIFA-Hollywood, major industry blogs, critics, peripheral organizations who are important to the community and the individuals who head them up.

How many of these individuals can actually draw?

It's remarkable really, I think we must be the only aspect of the entertainment industry that's run by people who can't do what we do. And virtually all of them are positioned to be in some sort of authority over us.

You have production people, producers, commentators, business reps, writers, critics, web managers, historians, and I doubt if any one of them have ever filled a page of a sketchbook in any meaningful way or made a serious attempt at creating the way we do, which is at the essence of our art. I'm not referring to the artists with personal blogs they maintain, I'm talking about major organizations, major online media outlets, major schools, major studios in our business, development executives, production managers, etc that are or come off as being in some way in control of us as a community of artists.

Only in animation. Maybe it's because we're too busy doing what it is that we do, and it's a natural evolution that people who aren't absorbed in the creative process as we know it wind up filling the places of support for what it is that we do. And in time, that's all morphed into control, either real or perceived.

I think it would be a good idea, or at least a fun thing to propose, that from here on out these people need to submit a sample of their artwork, a portfolio of some kind, something as simple as a few sketches, that would enable us to ascertain as a community whether or not they are qualified for the positions of authority they hold, either real or perceived, based upon the criteria that we must produce to prove ourselves in this biz.

In the words of the great Philip J. Felix and the timeless tactic he would use when confronted by authority figures in animation who couldn't draw, let's place a pencil in front of them... "Show me."

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Charles
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I want to make a point that this isn't personal against anyone. Some of these folks are really nice people. It's just an observation I've made and a subject I'd like to share with the AN community.

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bigshot
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I think that most people who draw for a living would rather draw than do the day to day fielding of calls and managing of a production. A good producer handles all that so artists can focus on what they do best. Animation is a field that requires all sorts of talents... artists, designers, managers and technicians. If everyone works together as a team, the process works well.

By the way, I do draw for my own enjoyment. Come by the Coral sometime and I'll do a doodle of your noggin on my placemat. The heads at the Coral are inspiring. That's where I do my best work. Chicken tortilla soup and funny caricatures of the family sitting two booths down... ahhh! That's the life!

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Paburrows
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Kind of to sum up and ehco what others have said.

1. Artists usually ether don't make the time or have the knowledge to run their own buisness/produce their own product.

2. Its the non-artists (buisness types that have the money and knowhow to run companies/ make a product profitable.

We complain that buisness types only care about money, but really thats what got then to a possition to beable to emply the artists. So the artists follow the orders of non-artist types because they have the money to pay them.

Until the Artists start thinking about making their education more then just art artists will always be working for the non-artists.

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E. Allen
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What they lack in one discipline, they make up for in another.

You know, conversely the executive can ask of the artist, "Why can't artists with their own studios manage them the way we manage ours?"

Artists, as a rule with few and dwindling exceptions, don't make good businesspeople. If I counted all the times I heard "I'm good at drawing but bad at the money part of it" quote thrown around, I think I'd still be counting.

This will change in the future as more artists learn the mechanics of properly balancing a balance sheet and the importance of records maintenance. Until then the aforementioned rule will, sadly, continue to be demonstrated.

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Charles
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To bigshot, I'll do that someday, my treat. Man, I haven't been to the Coral Cafe in a long time. Too many soap operas going on over there and I had to step away, but I'll be back. I miss the chicken tortilla soup.

I agree, it is a team effort, but when the people who answer the phones start commanding artists around, the balance is gone and there's something wrong. A couple of years ago on a project the school was contracted on, the producer/director who couldn't draw to save his life had the attitude that artists would be lost without guys like him. Even on a level of creative judgement and aesthetics. He was the biggest problem with the production yet in his mind, artists needed to be controlled and directed. Which certainly isn't the case, it's the other way around, and especially in the situation I'm referring to.

I think in many instances we just don't stand up for ourselves the way we should. For example, at a Guild meeting I attended last September, when the business rep shot down a request by Guild members to help do something about Disney's inappropriate and legally questionable release forms they have artists sign when they submit their portfolios, the thing more disturbing to me than his reply was the way the artists took it. There really wasn't a challenge, not the way there should've been. They were on top of it and pressed him on the matter, but consider this... The dude has never sunmitted a portfolio of his own to be reviewed for employment, so how would he really know or relate to what these artists are experiencing and how strongly they felt about the issue? And here he is, in complete authority over artists and a union of artists.

Anyway, it's an observation, and I'm sure people have their own stories.

I think the solution is in education and communication, in dialogue that addresses the situation, in assertiveness training for our community, and in seeing the sketchbooks of the people who think they command us.

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bigshot
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I really don't think artists are incapable of being businessmen. People who say that usually have no concept of either art or the business. There are only so many hours in a day; and for an artist, spending all that time on the phone and taking meetings takes them away from their core duty to the project- drawing. An artist shouldn't let himself get burdened by things that take him away from creating.

The people who taught me what it meant to be a producer emphasized that the job of a producer isn't to tell artists what to do; it's to make sure that the artists have everything they need to create. If they are sitting on their hands waiting for approvals or a scene folder, the quality will inevitably go down. The job of a producer is to support the artists, not supplant or second guess them.

There aren't a lot of real producers in animation.

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bigshot
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quote:
I agree, it is a team effort, but when the people who answer the phones start commanding artists around, the balance is gone and there's something wrong.
The problem is, not everyone who doesn't draw for a living is out to make life miserable for artists. Some of those folks who have made a place for themselves in the animation business without drawing are wearing white hats.
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Charles
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I completely agree. I think the line that artists don't make good business people is a myth that's propagated by people who want to be in control of artists, and artists wind up believing that of themselves. Even business people make bad business people.

Our love of creating and the time, attention and energy it takes is used against by others to position themsleves to be in control of us. We can break this vicious cycle and in time we will, as E. Allen has pointed out.

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SNAKEBITE
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"Why can't artists with their own studios manage them the way we manage ours?"

what, crappy? I mean, hell, if I had hundreds of thousands of dollars for budget or even millions I would show some executives how to run and produce artists...I'm just saying... these dudes get **** done cuz they have access to money, period. not because they know what they are doing.

I know what I can do with no money, by myself, with no direction or pay check...and most of the time I would compare it to any of the crap these executives are producing with crazy budgets and mad talent working for them.

I often argue these creative executives are losing money for said companies...I mean, if I run out of budget I can still produce and keep the ball rolling until money comes in...they lose money and don't have a sucker to work for free nothing happens....and even when they have money, they waste so much time...I dare someone to say otherwise...every production I've worked for its the corporate ******** that slows it down..not the creatives..although, creatives can be lazy too...but I see some of their paychecks, it can make a person lazy real quick...especially if your boss who wastes the most time pulls up in a mercedes or sumtin...

I said it before and I'll say it again, they make good employees not bosses...let them do their thang while I create and make the real money...I'll put my bonus right back in the machine to keep people working and producing..

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bigshot
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quote:
We complain that buisness types only care about money, but really thats what got then to a possition to beable to emply the artists. So the artists follow the orders of non-artist types because they have the money to pay them.
You're assuming that the one who raises the money makes the creative decisions. The best executive producers assemble a creative team and enable them to make good decisions on their own. The problem today is that executives are neither providing the money nor able to create themselves. They are spending corporate cash to fund their own hairbrained ideas and they are telling people who know better how to make films how the films should be made. THAT is the problem.

Artists need to stand up for what is best for the project and not just do what the people who pay them tell them to do. And producers need to enable production, not be a obstacle to it.

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Charles
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So if a non-artist is in control of artists but wears a white hat, that's justification or a license for artists to to let that person be in control of artists?

More mythology and manilupaltion in my opinion. A white hat goes to those who respect that artists are the ones who are ultimately in control. A white hat doesn't translate into control, and no matter what the color of your hat, I'd like to see the sketchbook.

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SNAKEBITE
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Amen Bigshot.

if artists learned that producers are just middle men to the money then they might understand getting the money is something that can be learned.

Once artists learn how to approach venture capitol then they can hire producers and executive types to do the work creators don't want to do..but should learn so they can oversee their employees.

There's new needs for new content all over the place. these usual suspects can't be everywhere. so position yourself for the future and grab hold of your destiny.

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bigshot
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quote:
So if a non-artist is in control of artists but wears a white hat, that's justification or a license for artists to to let that person be in control of artists?
What do you mean by "control"? A producer's job is to control the flow of the production. If he does a good job, the artists are free to create and do a good job at a reasonable pace. What is wrong with that?

quote:
no matter what the color of your hat, I'd like to see the sketchbook.
No matter how wonderful a person is, I'd like to hear him play the Hammerklavier sonata on the glockenspiel!
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SNAKEBITE
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only if we were in the business of playing sonatas on glockenspiels...then yeah, I would agree...

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bigshot
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You're posting on the internet... let's see your scripting. When you drive your car, we want to see you rebuild the transmission too.

Repect goes both ways.

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bigshot
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"Respect"
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Charles
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Respect goes both ways, but control is a one way street. Having respect does not mean artists have to give up control over our destinies and our lives and livelihood. Respect does not mean having to be submissive and giving up control to the point where it is detrimental to us while being beneficial to others. I say, and it's high time that it's said by us all, respect the artists and support what we do, respect the authority and control we'll increasingly be claiming, and you'll do better with us than against us.

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Charles
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And show us your sketchbook.

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bigshot
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Well, I've already answered all that and you are beginning to become overstimulated, so I'll leave it at that.
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Charles
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Show us your sketchbook Steve.

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E. Allen
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To clarify, there are plenty of examples of artists who have succeeded and/or are succeeding with their studios/endeavors.

We can all agree Gennedy Tartavosky likely doesn't need any major network from now on to get his stuff seen.

Ditto for Don Hertzfeldt, Plympton, Parker & Stone, and Will Vinton.

I can't name them all because I don't have the time to. I wish, though [Smile] .

Judging from recent history, and from artists I have personally conversed with, many failed artist-controlled start-ups would have been sustained if it weren't for three or four key decisions we all make from time to time, which don't endanger our personal endeavors but kill bigger, more complex studios (ones with more people involved/employed than just the artist).
I'm sure most of us are familiar with the implosion story of Stan Lee Media, so I won't go into that.

ION Storm, run by John "Gonna make you his b***h" Romero, would still be around if, for instance, he had decided that interior decor wasn't a priority expense. He co-formed Monkeystone, had a few internal disagreements before he took off for Midway and before you know, bye-bye Monkeystone.

No, the executives aren't brilliant. They have a rep for making some of the most bone-headed, head-scratchingly confusing calls we have ever learned of. They have more times than not made for themselves (as Steve has pointed out) a spot on a team that doesn't need them. For every Linda Simensky there's an Al Kahn. (His is the only name I feel like dropping, but we know more of them.)
But just as all artists/entrepreneurs are not made equal (some find the balance, a task of extraordinary complexity) all studio execs shouldn't be painted with same brush. It's especially difficult to make those distinctions since often times these are committee decisions where good executives are involved, and those bad decisions only serve to make their behind-the-scenes efforts at "restoring the balance" unnoticeable.

From my time majoring in Film at Brooks and talking at length about these things to Amy Heckerling (and her innumerable tales of run-ins with executives not specifically assigned to the production part of projects) to my recent conversations with talented insiders at Cinematheque programs, a common refrain seems to be that if artists were as creative in managing (and micromanaging, as needed) crucial elements of their enterprise--as they are in creating the product supporting its framework--they would make studio executives obsolete. Again, this seems to be a common refrain amongst many conversations I had, and it sounds like common sense.

Those kinds of producers Steve mentioned in earlier comments are slowly becoming prevalent on both sides of the entertainment industry, animation and live-action. As a result, we're seeing the greatest number of unmistakeable visions making it onto screens largely intact from the concept stage since silent film. They are learning that the tools once withheld from artists to make their own stuff without undue interference and get it to audiences have faded to memory--and if they want to retain their (and/or the company's) position in the marketplace & their jobs, they best follow the trend of giving the creative team a budget, a date for delivery then getting the hell out the way.

Snakebite, I'm sure you have some positive stories (whether you were personally involved or not) of producers/executives who got what Steve was talking about.

Again, artists are getting the hang of what it takes to be both creatively productive, and adept at achieving positive financial results when running their studios, by themselves or running it in concert with others, and digital tools plus evolving methods of digital delivery are helping them gain & retain this control.

A win for us, in that their visions are more purer and unmolested than ever by the time they get to our eyeballs.

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toonedbob
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Walt Disney - Artist who ran a studio
Hanna Barbera - Artists who ran a studio
Ralph Bakshi - Artist who ran/runs a studio
John Lasseter - Artist who runs a studio

Food for thought...

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siskavard
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I now know that I should have studied business instead of art if I wanted to have my own cartoon series.
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Greg B
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I've mentioned this so often I don't waste time mentioning it anymore.

Artists won't take responsibility for their own survival and become dependent on others to do their administrative duties. This leads to lack of control and inevitable exploitation.

Suits know this and when a collective of artists gets into motion all the suits need to do is pay some of them some money and dish out some fawning admiration and the collective falls apart.

Toonbob pointed out several examples of artists that handled their own affairs and reached legendary status.

Let me give a few more examples:

George Pal: master illustrator, sculptor, engineer, designer.

Ray Harryhausen: master illustrator, scupltor, engineer

Luigi Colani, master at everything he's ever touched.

All legends.

It behooves every artist to forego their egocentric viewpoints and take the time to study at least personal management and then law and business management. Even if it means taking part time classes at a community college. It will keep you out of the never ending grind of depending on others.

I learned early in my early 20's working for a large corporation and have been able to handle myself for decades. It's only been in the last 10 years I've been able to chat with people within the animation industry to see their side of the coin.

It doesn't mean you won't run into those who choose to exploit you. It's quite common, but when you have the knowledge you'll know how to change such situations to your advantage.

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Charles
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There's a lot of good wisdom expressed here and while we're waiting for bigshot to show us his sketches, let me say that this topic is not all doom and gloom. On the contrary.

The word is getting out to artists and people of all kinds, case in point, the girl who interviewed me and thus helped to create this subject, and that in and of itself is helping to initiate more awareness.

I know some guys, artists, that are trying to pull off something in the business of animation that's never been done before, as far as I know. They've been at it a long time and I give them a lot of credit for sticking with it. Not even this industry's best business people wouldn't attempt what they're doing, especially in the current economy. At first I was very sceptical, I admit, but lately they're winning me over. I'm starting to think that they're actually going to pull this off.

When they get their break, I don't think anyone is going to tell them what to do. It'll be the other way around, and soundly at that. The business team they've put together is doing just what they should be doing, which is attending to their jobs, responsibilities and expertise in support of the artists, and leaving the artists in control. Not just creatively, but in regards to the business as well.

What's making this possible is the age of instantaneous global communication, and an environment for marketing entertainment that is virtually liberated from the gatekeepers. Their business plan factors in traditional entertainment almost as an afterthought.

The age of the artist executive has been fast approaching and may already be here. Not in the ways we would normally think of executives, but with all the power to do what they do and more.

Business artists are out there. And they can draw. Be nice to them, we may be working for these guys someday.

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EustaceScrubb
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Other artists who have run successful (long term) studios:

Bill Melendez

Michael Lah

Bob Kurtz

Michael Sporn

and there are more who could be named.

It doesn't have to be a foregone conclusion that someone who is an artist in incapable of running a studio, but I'll also bet that every one of those artist studio owners associated themselves with strong business managers/production managers who they trusted and who provided an integral part of the success of those studios. (There would be no "Walt Disney" -- as a business entity-- without Roy Disney.)

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E. Allen
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quote:
Artists, as a rule with few and dwindling exceptions, don't make good businesspeople.
I still stand by these words, and posit that those artists mentioned ARE the exceptions. Since many of them are no longer among us, who's to know when we will see another Bill Melendez, another Will Vinton, another Bakshi, Harryhausen. . .

I wouldn't hold my breath.

You know, I feel they thrived because they did something different, even daring FOR THEIR TIMES. Because of them, more artists have learned for their example, and are excitingly blazing their own path, and fewer among them will prevail as the exceptions to the above "rule" that Disney, Bakshi, Harryhausen, Vinton and Lasseter once were or are.

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E. Allen
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quote:
It doesn't have to be a foregone conclusion that someone who is an artist in incapable of running a studio, but I'll also bet that every one of those artist studio owners associated themselves with strong business managers/production managers who they trusted and who provided an integral part of the success of those studios.
EustaceScrubb, you nailed it!

The hat trick will be, who among the artists can hold up without the involvement of those strong business managers/production managers? Their lawyers?

To make this scenario even scarier, the exceptions are the artists who can pull it off going on their ADVICE, vs. their INVOLVEMENT.

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Charles
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Michael Eisner disclosed his secret for managing the Disney Company. You don't need to know how to do everything, just surround yourself with people who do. How is that diferent from an artist operating the same way? Why would an artist be a bad business person because he or she needs a business person to help make their business work. Why would a non-artist CEO be different if they didn't know what they were doing but associated with the specialists they needed to make the business work.

I was thinking about the subject and came up with this analogy. Our industry is like a symphony orchestra, and executives and others who position themselves to control us are the maestros. They may know how to read music but they don't know how to play an instrument. They're at the head of the orchestra, waving their baton and putting on the biggest show. Everyone watches the maetsro, including the audience of course, as they flamboyantly and dramatically lead an ensemble that is perfectly capable of creating music without them. The maestro can't play an instrument, but rationalizes and convinces everyone else that the orchestra needs them in order to perform, and in time, even the musicians become convinced that this is the case.

Anyone in the orchestra can stand at the podium and wave a baton when there's great musicians to perform the symphony, but the same can't be said for the maestro who would be at a complete loss if they were to reverse roles.

The same holds true in our biz, or rather the mentality that many artists have been conditioned to accept. That we're not good business people, that we need non-artists to direct us, that deviation from this is somehow disrespectful, that attempts to control our destinies or rise to levels of authority is heretical.

If Eisner can do it, artists can do it. Surround yourself with people who know how to do the things you need, just like a CEO would, get the support you need from a staff just like an office manager would, and you're doing in essence the same thing they are in a business situation.

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Metsys
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Yes, there's no reason why someone can't be a good businessman, in the same way that there's no reason why someone can't be capable of balancing a checkbook, but the thing is that you need to have the skills to do it, and there many things that can get in the way. I do wish illustrators got more business training. I'm fortunate in that I got my degree in graphic design first and became an illustrator later. We were taught how to be business and marketing-minded while still being constant learners and being an artist at our core. We were taught as if we going to be freelancers.

I know that not everyone is well-rounded, and even with training people may still have a very hard time managing a team, knowing how to market a product, write/understand legal documents, and be able to wrap their heads around production costs. And of course most people don't have any capital. It's a lot of work and bigger projects need people that have years of experience and specialization in a field.

Most of the problems seem to be in having a lack of people who CAN actually manage teams well. People that are without guile, are not defensive, can take advice, understand what people's roles, and make everyone feel like their contributions matter.

As EustaceScrubb pointed out, most people, including artists, can't produce and sell work in isolation. They need people to help them, and they need to be people they can trust. That's why getting to know people, networking, and partnerships are so important. It's also why you need to be easy to work with. It's why communication is so. Even though I have no real experience with this, except with our small 4 person team and observing larger studios, it seems to me that studios live and die due to personal conflicts within the company. Are people happy with their contributions? Is someone wanting to take credit for someone else's work? Are people kept busy? Are people too busy?

Knowing how to truly manage people is a skill that that very few people seem to have, and those that could fill the part of a director or producer role may never get the opportunity.

I think the best relationship within a studio is this: Director has complete creative control over the project. Producer works with director to make sure HR and financial aspects are working perfectly. And then you have the executive, the big cheese, the guy that makes all the decisions. I wonder if the best way to do that is to have that guy be a creator as well (maybe even the guy that directs), so they have the heart and soul of what the studio does so he/she can make those big decisions, but all the business and legal stuff is delegated to people below him and they consult with him about those matters.

But the key thing is that you need the director, producer, and executives to all be the type of people that are without pride, can explain effectively why they want to make the decisions they want to, and can understand each other.

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Greg B
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Good points.

Bottom line is if you have to depend on others, pick the people you can trust. Every day I'm continually surprised that people I've gone to school with or worked with when I was young are now running major areas of governments globally. Some are the top lawyers in the country. We all studied law and science together.

What's funny to me is they'll say how they wished they could do what I can do which is sit at home and enjoy doing art. The hustle and bustle of Washington and Wall Street and Madison Avenue drives them crazy. They can't conceive that I could have problems in business and it took a long time for me to figure out how these people with 7 figure incomes and much more couldn't comprehend that us artists have problems. Then one day one of the top entertainment lawyers out here, a guy I used to watch tv with as a kid told me that if it wasn't for us artists he and his field would collapse. He told and showed me the path that occurs whenever an artist, musician etc. creates something new, the series of engines that go into play. It was like tons of paperwork, files, projections etc. Then he showed me the path of income generated from just one stage of a completed project, the trademarkes, patents, copyrights ad nauseum. He said when the artists move, he and his firms had to change the world. He said one new character design could set off alarms. He and his wife used to never have a clean vacation because as soon as some guy designed a new character, or came up with a new procedure or invention they would get the barrage of phone calls and confirmations and signatures etc.

The artists weren't aware of this because they were busy creating. It was management's job to keep the paperwork off the artist's back. The more the artist created the bigger the equity in the IP grew.

So if you want to do your own business management you really have to study and get the basics and then find people you can trust to assist you. Let them do their jobs without being a control freak and you should do well.

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bigshot
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<I>Why would an artist be a bad business person because he or she needs a business person to help make their business work.</I>

It's important to appreciate and respect all of the diverse talents that it takes to run an animation studio. No one person can do it all alone.

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Charles
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While we're waiting for bigshot to share with us some of his drawings, being respectful goes without saying and really doesn't have much to do with this topic. Except if it's used as a means of trying to keep artists down and in their place by suggesting that if they run the show or rise to greater levels of power and influence, then that is somehow disrespectful.

Challenging an exploitive system is not disrespect, and can only be construed that way by people who mistakenly see that challenge as a threat.

Show us your sketches guys.

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bigshot
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How about showing respect to members of the animation community who have never "tried to keep artists down and in their place", but on the contrary have enabled and supported artists more than many artists do themselves?
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Charles
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Okay, I'm down with that, but does it mean that artists have to be perpetually in the control of people who are not artists?

You're playing the same cards and dropping the same manipulative guilt trip lines that've been played on us for decades. I heard that bs all the way back at Hallmark, all of it coming from department managers who were making more money than artists, had the biggest offices, lived a better life and had a vested interest in keeping all the sheep in their place. It only goes so far.

Show us your artwork man.

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KevinO
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I'd say bad analogy on symphony conductor, as all conductors of symphonies have prior musical instrument knowledge and most great ones are composers themselves, either on piano or many cases one of the lead stringed instruments like violin. They may not know how to play all the instruments but know how they should sound in their head when reading the written note.

Train conductors might fit tho... [Wink]

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E. Allen
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Challenges grow the industry, and makes us better artists and businesspeople.

As Greg B, Metsys and bigshot continue to make some awesome points, let me reiterate what Snakebite said earlier.


quote:
I know what I can do with no money, by myself, with no direction or pay check...and most of the time I would compare it to any of the crap these executives are producing with crazy budgets and mad talent working for them.

I mean, if I run out of budget I can still produce and keep the ball rolling until money comes in...they lose money and don't have a sucker to work for free nothing happens....and even when they have money, they waste so much time...I dare someone to say otherwise...every production I've worked for its the corporate ******** that slows it down..not the creatives...

If you can still produce without being heavily dependent on money or people, imagine what a force your studio would be with ten or twenty equally-talented, trusted people, willing to follow orders?

On a personal note, I don't plan on going into business myself. As bigshot has noted earlier, I like to focus on creating more--than day-to-day administrative duties. However, if my business is still going to be here in 10 years, it would behoove me to gain those skills even if I find myself in an ideal situation where I will never have to use them.

If you want something done, and done right, sometimes you fall into the role of handling those things yourself. Incompetence, like a contagion, will always remain a prime concern for artist-run organizations dependent on the skills and abilities of others.

Like orchestras with some sub-standard violinists!

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bigshot
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Please define how artists are under the "control" of me. If you want to know what it's like working as an artist alongside me in a studio, why don't you ask someone who has worked with me? Don't judge me by the job I perform. Judge me by how well I do it

I'm here participating in your forum. I go to your meetings when I can. That's a sign of respect from me. It seems to me there aren't many producers who have been bigger champions of artists' rights than me. I'm working full time on giving back to artists. What's the point in the continual slagging? I'm not the person you are talking about. Focus on the real problem.

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SNAKEBITE
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This issue isn't about you, Bigshot....although I'd like to see your sketchbook. I'm a fan of sketchbooks.


here's some great Insight from Daniel Pink on how creatives are the new CEOs and what they need to make it happen

"According to Pink, achieving professional success and personal satisfaction in the Conceptual Age is dependant on our ability to deploy six essential aptitudes or "senses": design, story, symphony, empathy, play and meaning. For maximum impact, we will need to complement L-Directed reasoning with the six essential R-Directed aptitudes to yield a holistic mind. To highlight the difference in the two perspectives, Pink poses the dynamic this way: "Not just function but also DESIGN. Not just argument but also STORY. Not just focus but also SYMPHONY. Not just logic but also EMPATHY. Not just seriousness but also PLAY. Not just accumulation but also MEANING." Karim Rashid captures the essence of this sensibility in his exhortation to "Think extensively, not intensively.""

Design, Story, Symphony, Empathy, Play and Meaning

wow, sounds like something I learned in Conceptual Development class.

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