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» AnimationNation   » General Discussion   » Fox and the Hound

   
Author Topic: Fox and the Hound
Richard
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I was researching Asian studios and seeing which US-based animated shows they worked on when I came across TMS in Japan on Wikipedia. They did a bunch of Animaniacs episodes, the Mighty Orbots, and a bunch of the Disney afternoon fair. I noticed that under their feature work was Walt Disney's The Fox and the Hound. I was rather baffled given that I tried to find additional information on TMS's role on this film without any success. I don't know if they did anything on the film itself or just its adaptation to the Japanese market.

Does anyone here know if they played a role in the animation process of The Fox and the Hound?

Thanks.

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Richard
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Here's a link to some info on TMS (by the way, it's an acronym for Tokyo Movie Shinsha).

Tokyo Movie Shinsha on wiki

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E. Allen
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Tokyo Movie Shinsha is, in my highly unprofessional and layman opinion, one of the very best animation houses in the world. They're not an Akom; what they do is at least on par with Madhouse and France's SIP. They can crank out beautiful work under some of the tightest, most unrealistic deadlines known to pros working under them today.

No I have never worked with them, but just fantasize about them. One day, I'm sure, it can happen.

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E. Allen
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That's what I get for typing fast and posting without thinking.

I don't, personally, know if they worked on Fox and the Hound, but wouldn't be surprised if they did. Although recently at the 20th Little Mermaid event in Burbank, the question has come up as to whether Disney farmed out work overseas when Mr. Musker discussed how the bubbles in Mermaid were animated in China, but everything else was done right here in the good old US. I suppose, therefore, it would be fair to assume that no part of Fox and the Hound was shipped out.

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Ben Burgess
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'FOX and the HOUND', 1981 production release.

This original feature was painted entirely at the Disney Burbank lot in the Ink & Paint Department.

One of the unique aspects of this particular animated film is the type of mylar acetate used. The cells used had a very slight unnoticeable yellowish tint that records on film in the warmish red spectrum of light. A lower spectrum wave length of light through a prism is in the slower red wave length. UV light which is blue in spectrum through a prism is much faster and in the blue wave length. Look at a rainbow dispersion of wave length colors., red, green, blue. Wave length of light varies in speed of oscillation.

Also, for the first time in a Disney feature film an expensive PMT die color transfer process was used with these cells in the camera department for the character line colors. You will notice a slight softer transition from color cell to outline color of each character. Basically avoiding the use of a Xerox black transfer line to the cell as used in prior films.

The very last scene shot actually used the old 'Multi Plane Camera' that was hardly ever use since 'Fantasia'. Todd over looking the farm from a hill top, slight trucking out camera move.

Each Disney animated feature has some new innovation, and on this film the unique use of a new cell technology. Disney's camera department/ Xerox photography group had to shoot each animation black line drawing onto one PMT color line transfer sheet. The exposed line image would record on the peel off sheet of precolored PMT cell. Not only that this was a wet development photography process that required peeling off and hang drying.

The PMT transfer process was like the Polaroid film peel off process. But, the cells used with the selected dye color line was then painted on the back side and then flipped over and shot on camera to warm color spectrum of light film.

Like the use of Kodakcrome (red spectrum) film instead of Ektachrome (blue spectrum) film.

This same process continued on ‘The Black Cauldron’.

Not to be confussed with 'Fox and the Hound II'. This is a recent film done in Austrailia by Disney.

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[IMG] http://www.creativeheads.net/jsmedia.aspx?j=fccfc9010e&spi=0&mid=5163&direct=1[/IMG][/URL]

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E. Allen
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Now that seems labor intensive.
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Dennis Woodyard
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quote:
Tokyo Movie Shinsha is, in my highly unprofessional and layman opinion, one of the very best animation houses in the world. They're not an Akom
There is a six degree of separation connect here for me. TMS animated the Galaxy Rangers, which was the first series I worked on in New York. On the other hand, I worked at Akom as a overseas supervisor for Universal's Exosquad. Small world.

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The Gods that smiled when you were born are Laughing now - My Favorite Fortune Cookie Saying

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Richard
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Thanks so much for the input! I don't know, however, what TMS worked on if it involved any of the production.

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EustaceScrubb
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quote:
"Although recently at the 20th Little Mermaid event in Burbank, the question has come up as to whether Disney farmed out work overseas when Mr. Musker discussed how the bubbles in Mermaid were animated in China, but everything else was done right here in the good old US."
Ummm, did he say the bubbles were "animated" in China ? I think you may have misunderstood.

If I recall correctly the bubbles were hand-INKED onto cels in China, but animated in-house by the Effects Animation dept. at Disney Feature Animation . I don't remember that any of the actual animation of the bubbles was sent out .

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E. Allen
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Thanks for your post contribution, Dennis! Exosquad was a fantastic show, grew up watching it on USA Network.

Didn't mean to put down Akom's work there, but they have a not-so-stellar reputation for under-delivering in terms of quality! Their name has been used as the punchline to many an animation joke since overseas animation houses became household names. The shows vary, but in a recent interview with Toonzone, Bruce Timm talked about (and correct me if I'm wrong here, absolutely) that he & his team for Batman: The Animated Series worked with Akom on the episode Cat Scratch Fever, and (hilariously) was so disappointed with what they got back from them that they swore never to work with Akom again (and I don't think they did).

On the other hand, Akom has produced some terrific work for Red Planet, the animated mini-series for Fox, as well as a number of other animated properties. So while Akom gets respect every now and then, some of their less-polished work (which became heavily publicized) caused them to take critical hits to their reputation--as I'm sure you might be able to confirm for us, Dennis!

Hope you can tell us more about your time with Akom!

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E. Allen
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Yes, you may be more accurate on that one, Eustace.

I was a listener in the audience, and before John Musker made that crack about the guy facing down the Chinese tank holding a suitcase supposedly filled with Disney's cels (I think that's how the joke went), it sounded like Tina, Ron and John were talking about some limited animation of the bubbles taking place in China--though, as you have just pointed out, I may have thoroughly misheard that one.

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EustaceScrubb
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E.Allen that's possible , too. (some limited animation of bubbles done in China, as well as the inking) .

I wasn't in the Effects Dept. on Mermaid , so if that was the case I never heard about it at the time. I do remember that it was well-known around the studio at the time that the INKING of the bubble effects animation on to cels was being sent out to China.

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E. Allen
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Either way, we can both agree that roughly 99% of The Little Mermaid was completed right here in the good ol' US, a feat that neither the Mouse House nor most of the major animation studios can claim to repeat these days with any regularity!
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Richard
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I have to concur, Allen. We've hollowed ourselves into oblivion, regardless of how many idiots parrot that this is a global economy.

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Mr.U
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Hello everyone !
I don't know if you remember, but TMS did a fantastic "test" for the Little Nemo feature. They ended up not working on the film, I believe, but the test was amazing !
Here it is on youtube

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Richard
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Thanks Mr. U! Amazing stuff from those guys!!

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KoreanAnimation
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quote:
They can crank out beautiful work under some of the tightest, most unrealistic deadlines known to pros working under them today.
I will vouch for Korean Animators, they can also work until tight and unbelievable deadlines and make it!

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E. Allen
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I have to agree, KoreanAnimation, although with Korean houses it is a more hit and miss kind of deal. Allow me to explain.

Saerom's work on CatDog and especially Fantastic Four has got to be some of the worst animation ever to be finalled (approved) for airing on television. From clearly off-model designs to mismatched/mis-timed lip-sync to an extraordinary abundance of clunky animation (for CatDog, incomplete walk/run cycles--I'm not going to pick on CatDog too much, that's too easy a target, but for Fantastic Four, another show widely derided for its low-quality crank-'em-out animation, Saerom clearly underperformed on that one, which is why for the second season the creative team decided to ship the animation to--correct me if I'm wrong--the Philippines, where the visual quality of the show fared better.

Dong Woo is a high-quality studio, but even they have had their fair share of mis-steps, one of them being occasionally Jackie Chan Adventures; also Ozzy & Drix. Looking at their respective Wikipedia webpages, I was able to put two and two together since prior to having access to this info on what house animated what, I was in the dark on everything except how I felt about the end product.

Above all, let me make one thing clear. I study the quality of work that comes out of overseas animation houses, but have never worked, indirectly or directly, for or with any one of them. One day, I would like two, starting the aforementioned TMS and Madhouse.

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E. Allen
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quote:
One day, I would like two, starting the aforementioned TMS and Madhouse.
That should be, "would like to, starting the aforementioned TMS and Madhouse."

Again, was typing too fast. . .

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E. Allen
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Damn it!

"Starting with the aforementioned TMS and Madhouse."

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Richard
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Now what would the quality be like if they decided to do the work in the USA? (barring current "gumption")

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