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Author Topic: Moving on...
Don Bluth Productions
IE # 89
Member # 2512

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As an animation Artist/Director, I have a tendency to get involved in all facets of production on an animated film. I obsess over character design, voice talent, animation, layouts, color, and even the final dub of the film. After a 12 hour day, I take all the production challenges to bed with me so I tend to lose a lot of sleep. However, once the picture is finished and out in the theaters, I forget all about it. In fact, and this is the odd part, I never return to view the finished product again.
For me, once I finish the artwork, the thrill is gone. Furthermore, I don't have any pictures of any of my movies hanging on the walls in my home. Does anybody have a similar experience?
Please tell me I'm not alone...

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http://www.donbluthanimation.com

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SNAKEBITE
IE # 101
Member # 17

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well, I don't have the experience of all the movies you do but that is totally me. I live by "the body forgets but the page/frame reminds you forever" mantra. I slave over stuff. Spend stupid time on something that isn't paying me to spend stupid time on. Another reason I'm so damn picky..and broke,lol. In my experience I don't take a lot of jobs because they don't fit my quality criteria. Elitist? maybe. Perfectionist? I wish. I just like to be associated with my best....well, best at the time. Because once I'm done, I hate it. All I see is my imperfections. I might be able to come back from time to time and say "hey, that was pretty cool" but for the most part I say "man, I wish I lost more sleep on that one".

I guess thats why you're so damn good, Mr Bluth. After all, I look to people like yourself and say "thats the mother ****in bar right there, I got to reach it or jump over it"...well, thats my intent at least, but I'm far from mastering my intent.

I guess thats what keeps me going. if I didn't have that drive, I guess it would be time to die.

Without deadlines, I would spend a lifetime tweaking my ideas...hence why I'm still working on content thats 10 years old...I'm so silly. geesh.

I try to surround myself with people who think like this. I'm disappointed with collaborators who don't share this attitude. I take that stuff personal. I want people around me that are better and more driven than myself. Life is too short...or too long depending on where you start.lol

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contact@animationnation.com
www.artbysnakebite.com
www.myspace.com/mrbite
www.redskystudio.com
www.myspace.com/redskystudio

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Pixel Pusher
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Member # 1558

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Don, did you forget to mention that you obsess over the story as well, or did you leave that out because you don't?

Just wondering.

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Otterslide
IE # 38
Member # 346

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Maybe if had as impressive a resume as yours I might have some art or something on my walls. As it is I have one poster from the first film I directed, but that's it. None of my other work as either an animator or director, or even from my comicbook artist days, hang on my walls. The only reason I even keep the one poster up that I do have is because the marketers actually used my own design for it.

No matter how obsessive I become with a project while I'm working on it, it is dead to me once it's done. Glad to know I'm not the only one.

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Bryon E. Carson, Proprietor
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tstevens
IE # 234
Member # 801

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There is no need to start making snide comments. We are fortunate to have Mr. Bluth posting here as himself. If you want to make low comments atleast give people the luxury of knowing who you are and what you do.

As for the topic... I think most people tend to not revisit projects once they are in the can. However, with digital I tend to find that the tinkering portion can go on forever since the variablees are that much greater. Even though I work in commercials, I find the director constantly sitting over my shoulder making corrections that are akin to sitting in the eye doctors chair: "Which one is better - A or B - B or C, A or B." It can go on for days.

Interestingly enough, most actors tend to say that past a premier many of them never return to watch thier old work as well. I also consistently hear live action directors comment in the same way.

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http://www.foogersnarts.blogspot.com

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toonedbob
IE # 45
Member # 422

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If I do something I'm proud of and it was an enjoyable experience, I love having mementos of the production around to remind me of the "Good". I also like reshowing it to new audiences who didn't get a chance to catch it the first go around and see their reactions. I love thinking a bit about the past as I work on the future. It teaches me of what worked and what didn't, helps get me motivated to do better the next time. It's the whole, "if you don't learn from history" then you're doomed to repeat it."
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Metsys
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Member # 3503

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I haven't done anything big like a movie (I am in the middle of working on a comic book though, which is big to me). For my other smaller projects like illustrations, music, and motion design, I do watch them over again after the project is done, especially for the next 2 weeks or so after I've finished it. I'm not sure why I do that, self-admiration I suppose. [Smile] I just like the feeling of, "I did that," and reliving it. Now, I haven't spent years working on the same project, so in that case I may have already spent so much time on it, possible more than I wanted to, so I wouldn't want to look at it again.

And being very busy could be part of it to too; you may not have time to review your past work over and over again, so you'll have no interest in it because there's another fascinating project on the pipeline already. Now that I think about it, since I started working on the comic I haven't reviewed my most recent freelance motion design work over and over again because there's something else more interesting to do than wait for the next project and admire what I've just created, because I already have another project to work on.

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http://glenmoyes.blogspot.com

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knowledge
IE # 258
Member # 462

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Don, do you have artwork/posters from any Disney classics that inspired you? I know I do, and hope to have them all around my studio one day to help inspire the artists working with me! I suppose I will have artwork/posters of my productions on the walls of the studio as well, but don't know if I would around my house. Might rather have a nice Mary Blair original or two instead!!
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VAN_Paulus
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Member # 149

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Don
I can watch only some the work afterwards but there needs a delay of about a year .
I am very critical of what i was involved in and can only see its flaws. But with some time i can view it with a little more objectivity.
When one works for two years with a small team of animators like on Land which involved a major move during its production , the film becomes a coded scrapbook of the two years spent on the project . I find i cant help but remember who drew the scenes and what they were up to at the time.
Its very odd .Its like I make an association between the on screen images and the artists that i witnessed creating the animation. With an ocean of subtext below the surface of every shot.
Kind of like watching the picture with an "animators" commentary track that is loud and cannot be turned off.

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ColorInAble
IE # 68
Member # 1444

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I really hate to say it, but as a VFX Artist, for the most part once I see the premier (in the few times when I as a lowly VFX artist am worthy of a seat at a Premier), I don't revisit it much again. I think the only exceptions are I will sit and watch parts of "Dragon Storm" and "The Last Sentinel" when they are on Sci-Fi.

It's sort of moot though, I have all the movies I've worked on on DVD, I could watch any of them at any time. Everyone should have a copy of the final product of what they worked on, once they legally can (I.E. it's out on DVD, or you have permission from the rights holder).

But I know my work in the films intimately, first from working on it, and then from editing my Demo Reels...

[nono] Why watch the stuff I've worked on when there is an episode of Family Guy on somewhere... [cheers]

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sykohyko
IE # 264
Member # 549

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I make little web shorts, and I feel the same way. I get really excited and motivated about the project while working on it, but the minute it goes up online, I move onto a new idea and don't look back.

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www.moolt.com

http://www.youtube.com/harutoon

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Richard
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Member # 247

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I tend to do the same, Don. I feel once something is done, I have the urge to go on to the next project or drawing since we're always in the process of growing.

Thanks for sharing. You have always been an inspiration for me!

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www.richardjgaines.blogspot.com

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Greg B
IE # 118
Member # 886

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I ain't got enough room to post all the art.

Why not enjoy the fun all over again by posting the art that raised you up?

Flaws are part of life. If you didn't see flaws in your work and enjoy the joy of not being flawless you ain't havin' fun.

If you ain't your biggest fan, you ain't your biggest fan.

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http://www.boonestoons.com
http://www.spacefool.com

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ColorInAble
IE # 68
Member # 1444

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After posting, I was thinking about this and realized a funny thing...
While I don't really revisit the moving work (film, TV, web, animated or live action), and while I don't really revisit the sequential art (comics I've done in the past), as for the visual art I've been making the last few years, Some of it is up on the walls, and I look at it every day...

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Don Bluth Productions
IE # 89
Member # 2512

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quote:
I just like to be associated with my best....well, best at the time. Because once I'm done, I hate it. All I see is my imperfections. I might be able to come back from time to time and say "hey, that was pretty cool" but for the most part I say "man, I wish I lost more sleep on that one".
What we have experienced in growing tired of our own drawings is very common. Personally, I've always tried to look at it with optimism since it really means that artistic growth has taken place while I was sleeping. No matter how great we think we are, there's always somebody better. I remember the Nine Old Men making me feel, unintentionally, very small and inadequate.

One afternoon, John Lounsbery got stuck on a drawing problem and couldn't solve it. I watched him storm out of the room, teeth clenched, and mumbling, "I'm going to Milt Kahl to get a good drawing." That moment was an eye opener for me: Even John Lounsbery, my animation hero sometimes needed help. Furthermore, I was fortunate on other rare occasions to stand behind Milt and watch him make a drawing. He was the master! Once, I even heard him say, " Damn, I wish I could draw."

I guess the moral of the story is: All of us are a work in progress....

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http://www.donbluthanimation.com

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SNAKEBITE
IE # 101
Member # 17

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amen Brutha Bluth!

once we are satisfied is when its time to die.lol

I get ass kicked much by these young dudes showing me whats up with photoshop. And now with the internet theres so many reminders of how many talented people there are. The best are not employed.

But the key is not t be discouraged. Just have fun. make mistakes and learn from them..or if you're lucky enough go down the hall and get that dude whos better than you to show you whats up.

Let go of ego and your ego will thank you for it.lol

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contact@animationnation.com
www.artbysnakebite.com
www.myspace.com/mrbite
www.redskystudio.com
www.myspace.com/redskystudio

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