AnimationNation Forum

AnimationNation


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» AnimationNation   » General Discussion   » Thesis Paper: Scribes v. Artisans

   
Author Topic: Thesis Paper: Scribes v. Artisans
Semaj
Member
Member # 3131

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Semaj   Email Semaj         Edit/Delete Post 
At the risk of relaunching a recurring debate, I'm working on a thesis that tries to bring a clearer picture to making an animated cartoon.

This is based from Chapter 6 of the Scott McCloud book "Understanding Comics" we went over last quarter. If comics can be written in seven ways, why should animated cartoons be written only one way? Is there even a legitimately intrinsic process to making cartoons? Elsewhere, we talk constantly about the many bad cartoons that happen to be storyboarded, while scripted cartoons have been proven successful under the correct frame of thought.

I'm looking for some useful sources that could build up this statement. Are there any examples in history where an artist or a writer crossed paths or collaborated on different projects? Any present-day animators or writers that can be interviewed on the topic?

It could also open the doors to several related questions; should animation be classified as a graphic art or a performance art? Because animation requires skills in several different areas, which venue speaks best for the medium?

IP: Logged
dermot
IE # 193
Member # 1575

Icon 1 posted      Profile for dermot   Author's Homepage   Email dermot         Edit/Delete Post 
I'm not exactly sure what you mean about the 7 vs 1 way.....................but I've seen a lot of good and bad animation storytelling styles.

Art-direction....sequence timing.....narrative styles.....from "Waking Life" to "Akira" to "Little Mermaid"

I think once one has committed to "2-D" styling one has to work within rules for presentation that can be set for each project in terms of cutting / limited vs classical / graphic scene transitions etc . CG and stop-motion are just another style . Animatrix used 8 or 9 (?) minichapters all in relation to explaining alternative elements of the matrix that actually tied in very well to the movies ( especially the backstory )

The only final determining motive or result for me being "does it tell the story well?" in an appropriate form .

--------------------
http://zoomfrog.blogspot.com/

IP: Logged
dermot
IE # 193
Member # 1575

Icon 1 posted      Profile for dermot   Author's Homepage   Email dermot         Edit/Delete Post 
oh yeah....re the graphis or performing art classification..............it's not "live"......but the final product is more than graphic art since it also involves voice acting / music / sound effects / multiple-timed drawings....and overall a time-locked presentation whereas comics can be read at the pace of the readers imagination ; maybe it's Graphic Opera !

hehehe

--------------------
http://zoomfrog.blogspot.com/

IP: Logged
Semaj
Member
Member # 3131

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Semaj   Email Semaj         Edit/Delete Post 
What I meant by 7 vs. 1 (really 2) is that with comics, explained in "Understanding Comics", a story of words and pictures can be presented in seven ways:

1) Word Specific: Story driven by dialogue
2) Picture Specific: Story driven by visuals
3) Duo Specific: Words tell exactly what is happening visually
4) Additive: Words embellish the visual scenario
5) Montage: Words are part of the main picture
6) Parallel: Words and pictures exist in same scenario, but on different levels
7) Interdependent: Words and pictures work together to tell the story

Whereas with animation:

1) Storyboards: Based from a brief written outline. After the sequences are revised and rearranged, the dialogue and general soundtrack are translated into scripture. Emphasized as the traditional approach to cartoon storytelling.

2) Scripts: Also based from an outline, but everything is written and edited before it is ever storyboarded. Storyboards merely function to visualize the final script, sometimes merged with the layout process. Typically the modern storytelling method.

Yes, there are some bad storyboarded cartoons and some good scripted cartoons, which many storyboarding proponents refuse to admit. But it is the controversy of the latter that has partially driven me to stress the validity of it. Given the current success of some scripted cartoons, and the creative merits behind them, that opens the door to a more versatile production system that neither script writers or storyboard artists have realized yet.

Maybe this is something that Brad Bird, Steve Marmel, or Mark Evanier can explain better than I can. How do we tear down the proverbial brick wall? How can we get the best of both worlds?

Finding definitive answers to these are essential to better defining this medium we call "animation", which may call for some revisions in the "cartoon language".

IP: Logged


 
Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | Animation Nation

Animation Nation © 1999-2012

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0