AnimationNation Forum

AnimationNation


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | | search | faq | forum home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» AnimationNation   » General Discussion   » Has the economy really come to THIS

   
Author Topic: Has the economy really come to THIS
miracle_sets
IE # 229
Member # 3224

Icon 1 posted      Profile for miracle_sets   Author's Homepage   Email miracle_sets         Edit/Delete Post 
Hello Animation Nationers,

Last night I was working late in the studio and got an e-mail from someone I had met in Southern Claifornia on one of my animation visits several years ago. I won't mention him by name as not to cause any odd feelings on his part but I was more than surprised to hear his news.

A month ago, I had e-mailed him just to see if he was open to taking on a project or two for me and I never heard back from him. His short e-mail last night told me that jobs for him had gotten so sparse that 4 days ago, he was evicted from his home and is now actually living out of his car near Burbank!

I admitt, I may live a sheltered life here in the midwest, but this man was/is an excellent talent. His portfolio was as good as anything I have ever seen. He had worked at Disney doing some aspects of animation work but mostly being a top illustrator specializing in being a Disney Princess expert and illustrating many DVD jackets for recent Disney animated movies.

The last time I was in Southern Claifornia was a year or more ago and he "seemed" to be doing fine when I saw him at an awards show. Have things really deteriorated to this extent or is this an isolated incident?

I wish you all the best and during this Thanksgiving season I encourage you all to count your...

Blessings,
Tom

IP: Logged
Ganklin
IE # 14
Member # 1864

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Ganklin   Author's Homepage   Email Ganklin         Edit/Delete Post 
things are looking a bit slim around NYC right now, too. the city is starting to get a tad quiet. not that i have my finger on the pulse of the industry here on anything like that, but i haven't heard of any long(er) term projects from the major studios around town.

i know for a fact that a few projects have been dropped or scaled back recently, too.

i think we're not going to feel the full effect of the current state of the economy for still a few more months yet.

--------------------
http://fsummers.blogspot.com/
www.shamoozal.com

IP: Logged
Charles
Administrator
Member # 7

Icon 14 posted      Profile for Charles           Edit/Delete Post 
Good to see you back Tom.

I'm confident that we'll be courteous here folks.

--------------------
 -

IP: Logged
Charles
Administrator
Member # 7

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Charles           Edit/Delete Post 
The economy looks to be in trouble. The American automotive industry is trying not to collapse. If it does, there's about 3 million people going to be affected, so they say.

One of my new students is a kid whose family is homeless. I was contacted by a city agency and asked if he could take some classes to give him hope since he's good artist and likes to draw, so I'm letting him study for free. He's lucky compared to others. His family has a place to sleep. They have to be in at 9pm and out by 6am. I don't know what they do during the day but at least they're not sleeping on the street. It's a straight laced middle class family with no home.

It's going to be a rough ride all around, but we'll get through it. Tom, if you or someone you know is in contact with the person you mentioned, please extend an invite to check in with us on Tuesday nights and hang out. They can get in touch with me here or through the school.

--------------------
 -

IP: Logged
Mr. Fun
IE # 63
Member # 352

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Mr. Fun           Edit/Delete Post 
Sadly, this is not news to me. I've known a few guys who have resorted to living out of their cars. Others have taken jobs bagging groceries, and doing menial work.

Nothing wrong with doing what you must to earn a living. This business has seen hard times in years past, and probably will again. The one bright note is, we're now a more robust business with a good deal more options. In the old days there were only a handful of studios where one might seek work.

Still, I'm afraid it's going to get worse before it gets better. The old days where studio bosses agonized over cutbacks are over. Today's corporations discard employees like used 2B pencils.

IP: Logged
tstevens
IE # 234
Member # 801

Icon 1 posted      Profile for tstevens   Author's Homepage   Email tstevens         Edit/Delete Post 
Our primary source of production is commercial. Fortunately we have been keeping up with our own advertising and that has made a world of difference. In the last week, we have had four inquiries: statistically we should get atleast one of those. We were also fortunate enough to see a project that we quoted in January of 08 come back to life. In an economy like this, you have to be willing to haggle quite a bit to keep productions in house. The downside of that is if you have to quote jobs at cost just to keep work coming in.

Our main selling point is that we can produce commercial animation cheaper than "New York or LA". Both of those towns will always have a solid core of clients. But when times get tough many of them will seek alternate places to produce and will accept 80% or 90% of the quality at maybe half of the price.

As for the economy, California has been the hardest hit state for mortgage defaults. At one point there was specualtion that the state was going to seek federal funds to stay alive but they opted not to.

--------------------
http://www.foogersnarts.blogspot.com

IP: Logged
Graphiteman
IE # 218
Member # 2092

Icon 1 posted      Profile for Graphiteman   Author's Homepage   Email Graphiteman         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
The one bright note is, we're now a more robust business with a good deal more options. In the old days there were only a handful of studios where one might seek work.
But wouldn't you say that is offset by the number of artists you have today? Rather than 2 or 3 schools internationally of reputation turning out a handful of grads every 3 years there're hundreds of institutions turning out grads every year.

A couple years ago I had heard a director say breaking into animation was like trying to get into the NBA. Not impossible but.....Y'know,I believe him.

IP: Logged
tstevens
IE # 234
Member # 801

Icon 1 posted      Profile for tstevens   Author's Homepage   Email tstevens         Edit/Delete Post 
You have to sit back and look at what "breaking in" means to most people. For a large contingency of students "breaking in" means getting a job at one of the feature studios or at a major game designer. Often the smaller studios are overlooked by people wanting to get into the "game" though ironically they may be the best way to get into the system.

Smaller studios offer people a shot at doing a lot of different jobs on a lot of different projects. The average employee at a small studio will probably have experience doing things that people working on features may never get.

I think Mr. Fun has it right: the options are far greater now than they were in the past.

--------------------
http://www.foogersnarts.blogspot.com

IP: Logged


 
Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | Animation Nation

Animation Nation © 1999-2012

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classicTM 6.5.0