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» AnimationNation   » General Discussion   » China bans foreign cartoons during "prime time"

   
Author Topic: China bans foreign cartoons during "prime time"
devourax
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http://www.cbc.ca/cp/entertainment/080220/e022004A.html

China wants outsource work from the U.S., but they ban U.S. cartoons from airing during their "prime time" hours.

go figure.

-dev

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Mel Allen Sink
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Them Commies!

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OFFBEAT
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I don't understand.. isn't most of our animation is made there??

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Animation Co-op
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China's protectionist policies are ironically presenting new opportunities for co-productions by small and mid-level U.S. studios:
http://www.o-meon.com/pages/news&features/n&f_2008/01-29_China_Rising.htm

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Animation Co-op
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quote:
China wants outsource work from the U.S., but they ban U.S. cartoons from airing during their "prime time" hours.
China actually doesn't want outsourced work from the U.S. They currently need outsourced work because 90% of their domestic market is dominated by foreign content (primarily Japanese). Domestic Chinese studios would love nothing more than to produce proprietary content, but the cards are stacked against this, according to a history that is touched upon in the article above.

Trade restrictions such as the one noted typically result in a knee-jerk reaction from "outraged" Americans. Yet the prime-time restriction is more of a problem for the captains of the major studios than it is for the Animation Nation. In fact, it is actually an opportunity for the Nation. Case in point:

China is restricting the majors from dumping content into their prime-time viewing hours, yet they still need content to fill those hours. The solution: co-productions with experienced overseas creators... not only the Nicks and Disneys, but grassroots folk like you and me.

Every situation is an opportunity.

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Animation Co-op
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For those interested in learning more about doing buiness in China (including the history, financial & legal environment, and all-important cultural considerations), the following is an excellent resource:

"China Now: Doing Business in the World's Most Dynamic Market" - by Mark Lam & John Graham
http://www.amazon.com/China-Now-Business-Worlds-Dynamic/dp/0071472541/ref=pd_bbs_1?ie=UTF8 &s=books&qid=1203799188&sr=8-1

I began with the middle chapters on negotiation, and then finished the remainder. Enlightening stuff.

Kevin Geiger

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Jasen
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More Info

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toonedbob
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Don't worry about the Chinese being deprived of American content. The streets are paved with DVDs of most big films as we are getting them into our theaters. [Wink]
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Animation Co-op
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True dat. All my friends there have already seen "Juno", and are as baffled by the dialogue as my American friends. [Wink]

KG

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Jasen
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Not to mention bootleg software & such. Movies is just the tip of the iceberg.

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Jasen
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Selling bootleg movies here on U.S. street corners isn't really the same.
I tried turning the table on Chinese pirated movies but never even sold one.
[Gary] [Wink]
(I made that type of noise once, it was back in
the summer of 1988, when a pack of wild possums attacked my testicles.)

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Animation Co-op
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Some perspective, from pgs. 315-316 of “China Now”:

“On November 9, 2001, the day before China was officially admitted into the WTO, Microsoft Windows XP was launched with an official price tag of about $180. Meanwhile, on the streets of Shanghai, pirated copies of XP had been selling for about $2 a “copy” for weeks. Bill Gates shouldn’t have taken it too personally – estimates are that 95 percent of all software in use in China is pirated. Indeed, Mr. Gates was overjoyed on a recent visit to Shanghai when the mayor there promised to clamp down – by ordering his own staff to stop buying pirated copies! And it’s not just software. Procter & Gamble complains that 40 percent of its shampoos marketed in China are knockoffs. Honda estimates that 60 percent of Honda motorcycles sold in China are not Hondas. Estimates of lost revenues from such piracy range widely – the highest one we’ve run across is $16 billion annually.

While it is certainly true that there are massive amounts of pirated software, CDs, and brand names in China, one need only look back in history to understand why. Most readers would be surprised to find that the United States was once a pirate vis-à-vis Europe and Britain. As the United States developed economically, socially, and technologically, the problem of piracy vis-à-vis the other countries eventually disappeared. As demonstrated later in this chapter, other developed or developing countries such as the United States, Japan, and Taiwan also traveled the same road of development in terms of IPRs.

As China develops economically and socially, the problem of IPR violations will become less severe. As per capita income rises, more and more people will be able to afford to pay reasonable prices for books, music CDs, DVDs, and the like. As Chinese companies begin to develop new technologies, they will need IP protections in order to be profitable and grow. Ultimately, the rate of economic progress will largely determine whether most of China’s companies or citizens will abide by the IPR rules mandated by the WTO, although more fundamental considerations such as legal consciousness, political culture, and cultural values cannot be ignored.”


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So, you see - it’s not so black and white. If we want cheap “legitimate” goods to be created overseas for our consumption by poor folks who earn pennies on the dollar compared to their U.S. counterparts, then we need to be prepared for the existence of piracy as an “equalizer”. It’s a reality of our global economy: something that the U.S. has historically engaged in… and U.S. citizens still do (ie. - before you get bent about piracy in China, make sure that your own hard disks are “clean”).

Complicating matters is the fact that any serious attempt by the U.S. to crack down on piracy in China is usually met with the mainland’s threat to pull its money out of our Treasury. When your country is mortgaged to the hilt in order to fund ill advised, endless wars for the benefit of military & industrial interests, it tends to leave you vulnerable on the moral authority front. [unimpressed]

So it goes. [guitar]

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Jasen
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It's no wonder why we are hearing more & more about

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Animation Co-op
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[puke]

It's hilarious to hear this "bunker hunker" crap coming from the party that has made us MORE dependent upon foreign interests, not less. [Roll Eyes]

When budget surpluses are squandered and turned into historic deficits, we are MORE reliant upon the British, Chinese, et al to bail out our Treasury - not less.

Schlafly is correct in one respect though... our country is run by an elite few and beholden to international interests. Wonder if that jarhead is as concerned about being sent to fight for Halliburton as he is about being sent to fight for the UN?

Fear of the hypothetical loss of freedom has proven to be a quite effective strategy for the voluntary surrender of actual freedom.

The "New World Order" is the same ol' world order. As it has always been since the colonial days.

Anyway... how about that primetime cartoon ban in China? [Smile] Grrrrr!!! [Mad]

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Jasen
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quote:
Wonder if that jarhead is as concerned about being sent to fight for Halliburton as he is about being sent to fight for the UN?
This should answer your question about that.

Anyway... how about that primetime cartoon ban in China? Grrrrr!!! [Wink]

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Animation Co-op
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Frickin' Chinese!!!
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Eric Hedman
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I thought the Iraqis had subcontracted out their IED making and the snipering to Halliburton too...

So that was Halliburton shooting at Halliburton....

Am I wrong? [Smile]

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Animation Co-op
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Well, subsidiaries of corporations have been known to sue each other, so it doesn't stretch the imagination all that much. [Wink]
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dermot
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It's been a while since I chatted with someone who gave me some interesting perspective on this ....but he gave a sample of how it can be awkward for their economy .

I was told that a number of years ago whoever had the TV series Transformers ( IRWIN? ) actually GAVE it to the Chinese stations to put on TV...the result being that over $500 million in tranformers toys were sold in one year( a net loss to their economy )

I'm sure there were a lot of domestic sales and piracy as well , but the rules about animation in China may be getting much more protective .

I believe any animation can be shown in China as long as it has the right amount of co-production money going to the right "partners"(wink).

The same person also told me that according to his ministerial connections there was to be an outright ban on anything "anime" or from Japan
( also notwithstanding certain financial
considerations for the right projects / people etc )

Maybe some of the lawyers / producers who write the current co-pro deals with China and read animationnation could shed some light !?

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-FP-
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quote:
So that was Halliburton shooting at Halliburton....
Yup. Picture Cheney in a Wimpy hat, saying "Let's you and him fight, heh heh, ow my aorta".
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Animation Co-op
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http://www.animationoptions.com/pages/blog.htm#wave
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OFFBEAT
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Everything should be made in China!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sEYIouqEdU

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OFFBEAT
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... I realize the mistake of that being Japanese..

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Animation Co-op
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No worries, Offbeat! That's a perfect illustration of the sort of ignorance that permeates most people's "understanding" of the global animation industry. [Wink]

Rock on! [Cool]

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