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» AnimationNation   » General Discussion   » Animation 101 at small college. Seeking input. (Page 3)

 
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Author Topic: Animation 101 at small college. Seeking input.
ColorInAble
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Monkey Dad...
I'm just betting that your students are the type that saw Toy Story when it came out originally, while in thier footy pajamas, and they said "I want to do that when I grow up" about 3D animation for the most part.

Then as the grew, every night they would scour the internet for every little crumb they could find about 3D, they downloaded Blender 1.0 the first day it was posted, and learned it becasue it was free and they were about 14 by that time...

And now you have them, with probably the best "Preschooling" any teacher would ever want. And in 15 weeks your Uber students might have their first animation.

I bet most people aren't as fimiliar or as driven (about 3D) as your 3D focused students. Quantum physics is hard to teach, unless every kid in your class has wanted to be Steven Hawkings since they were 7...

Half gahlords students just want to know enough about animation so they know how to use it when they make thier first live action feature film. And they have wasted all that time since footy pajama days watching crap like Hitchcock and Bergman, instead of researching texture mapping file formats for Maya, like your students. Those filmmaking fools...

gahlord,
Skipping modeling is such a wise choice. You actually have a chance with them in your constraints, and truthfully, in 15 weeks your time is better spent on other things than modeling. They will get it enough just from having to animate them that they will have a sense of what 3D is all about...

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ColorInAble
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Bigshot,
This is about the pencil? Right?

When I write things as disparaging as I have here, pretty much it's not a knock at an individual, but at the general tone of the conversation.

I didn't say you feel that way, I said that by the tone, some here seem to.

I have a feeling that some here aren't feeling so good about what they wrote in the "Either" about a bunch of theoretical students.

Becasue when I applied their logic to the actual students in Gahlords class, it feels mean and cruel.

And it does because what a lot have written here has been mean and cruel and narrow minded and short sighted.

I'm not the one who said that you have to be really good at drawing to animate.

I just took that statement others put out there as fact, and then applied it to Gahlords non art major students, before they even animated a frame. And judged what their product would be by the yardstick that many set out here.

Seems really unfair, doesn't it???

I only did what others did, I was just brave enough to do it in actuality, as opposed to theory.

And I did it to truly show how ugly it is...

Seems I have succeeded...

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Eric Hedman
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Animator means making something come alive.

Not to be confused with a "mover".
Who just pushes stuff around and hopes that is enough.

This belies the whole "acting" question.

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Ganklin
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i find it interesting that CIA dismisses the pencil as fast as bigshot and myself (and i do not worship at the alter of spumco) dismiss maya for a 101 class.

i'll say it once more. i believe firmly that basic fundamental understanding of drawing is essential to a beginning animator. every successful CGI animator i know can draw very well.

that also said, i do think this particular class, as its made up of non-animation students, should be treated a little differently. i think the focus should be on expanding their understanding of the medium as a whole.

but once again drawing comes into play. i remember working on a flash show a few years back where the storyboards were completely illogical because the chosen board artist couldn't draw to save his life. i mean, these were the worst boards i have ever seen. that was a tough production as confusion was the word of the day.

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Eric Hedman
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quote:
i'll say it once more. i believe firmly that basic fundamental understanding of drawing is essential to a beginning animator.
Hmmmmm.....

So Puppet animation isn't animation?

I know plenty of people who can draw and "animate who never get challenged with weight or balance because they animate the equivalent of talking mailboxes....

3D is no more and no less than the extension of puppet.

but instead of your camera, armature or lighting crapping out, your computer can die.

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monkeydad
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CIA, your insistence on speaking from ignorance and assumption truly boggles my mind.

Contrary to your assumptions, most of my students have no 3D experience prior to taking my class. Many are middle-aged, and exploring the use of 3D in their daily jobs. Several are older than me (I'm mid-40's) and taking the class simply because the subject interests them. And ALL of them, if they stick with the class, end up with finished projects at the end of the semester.

I realize that this throws a monkey wrench into your preconceived notions about what can be learned in a mere 15 weeks, but that's not my problem. Believe what you like; there's no way to stop someone from making ridiculous assumptions if they insist on doing so.

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ColorInAble
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monkey dad
No wrenches named after you in what you say in my life. Glad that your class is so diverse.

Like many things in this thread I and we all write about, we have to do some assuming. At least I read that this thread was about a 101 class...

Would love to
A - See your students work
B - Would love to hear them describe 3D and how it works after 15 weeks.

No dares, or expectations, just wondering what they come away with in 4 months...

And I think the thing which illustrates what I'm talking about here the most, and how some beleive that drawing is the only answer...
At this point I'd really like someone to find where in this thread I have said anything about having drawing skills being a bad thing, or that if you can draw, it means you can't animate.

All I have ever said in this thread is I can't see why quick accurate life drawing skills should be a manditory prerequisite for an introductory animation class.

And I'm still waiting for someone to actually spell out why you can't learn the fundamental points of basic animation unless you can life draw accurately and quickly.

Just becasue I said I don't see how it's manditory, doesn't mean I feel, or ever said, that all pencils should be outlawed. But some here perceive what I've written basically as that.

Please quote it from my posts on this or any thread I've contributed to an Animation Nation...

Please show me where I said Drawing and Animation never mix...

I am waiting...

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gahlord
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I think part of what makes this a contentious issue here is that this course is an introduction class that (I hope) develops some foundation for the students regardless of what medium they choose to pursue in the future (assuming they do choose to pursue a medium), but I do have to actually get them to produce something. I'm sort of free from the constraints of developing a "world class 3D program" or a "Ghibli Factory" or whatever.

So without knowing any particular medium, where to start.

If I ran the zoo I'd start them with some professionally machined armatures on a simple backdrop with a stop-mo rig. Whether a person can draw or not, if they have a decent armature they can usually get it to move. Translating that skill and the experience of animating that way (the frame-grabber helps translate that 3D world into a flat plane, and the drawers get the idea pretty quick too) can really get through a lot of basics in character movement.

I would end up at a loss when it came to bouncing and squash and stretch and all that as doing that in stop-mo requires some fancy footwork that would take away from the real lesson of keeping consistent volumes etc.

Maybe I'll switch to stopmo faster than I thought I would, once I get to basic character movement (walk-cycles, etc). Just pick the animation medium that is easiest to learn the principle (pixilation for emotional acting, anyone?).

So my goal is really to give the kids a good foundation that is applicable regardless of the medium. You know, what things really matter whether you're mucking with clay, drawing, painting, shovelling pixels etc. And then to give them a bit of time experimenting with each medium along the way.

What specific concepts and topics do you all think are important to any animator, regardless of whether they are doing 3D work, Flash animation, cel animation, stop-mo, sand-painting, etc? (perhaps I should start a new topic for this?)

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Ganklin
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i suppose the biggest and most important difference in being able to draw well for animation is that it has no limits. a puppet as eric points out, or a CGI model or even a Flash character, has its limitations. they can only bend or move so far without breaking and falling apart. i read recently that the pixar guys were concerned about the models for ratatouille and took pains to make sure the legs worked properly with that design.

i believe puppeting is based more in the realm of live action and performance. its action comes from a real time human litterally pulling its strings. it skirts the edges of what we define as animation.

drawn animation does not have this limit. as long as the the animator is capable of perceiving an action, real or imaginary, than it can be accomplished through the language that is implied through the storytelling.

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Ganklin
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gaylord, i think the most important concepts in animation are weight, timing, and spacing. these are basically the essence of good animation reguardless of medium i think.

i remember doing pixelation. it was fun and i think it will give students an idea of how to analyze an action which can then be distorted somewhat. clay is fun to play with too, as squash and stretch can easily be applied to it as well as learning how to maintain volume.

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ColorInAble
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Guess what...

Gahlord is teaching an Animation 101 class...

And his agenda is the correct one!!!

As for the concepts to cover, a short and incomplete list not in any real order...

Key Frames
Frame Rate
Ease In / Ease Out
persistence of vision
some sort of stage area (this goes by different names in stop mo than in Flash or in traditional or in 3D, but the idea is the same)
Squash and Stretch (and Slip might be good, especially if you get to character animation)
Basic Filmaking terms for shots (CU, LS, MS, etc...)
Basic Editing terms and what they mean (Cut vs Disolve, and what does a disolve say as opposed to a cut in a film)
Registration
Cheats (like shoot on 2's)
A little history is always good, as is a little looking to the future
what an inbetween frame really is
storyboard basics and production planning (time budgets!!!)

I hope others add more, you may want to start this question as a fresh topic...

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Eric Hedman
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Hey, maybe there should be a max character count on these entries.

So much fun. [Smile]

Brevity.
It's not just for breakfast anymore. [Wink]
Then again...who am I to talk? [Big Grin]

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Eric Hedman
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2's are not cheats. [Big Grin]

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gahlord
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Oh yeah. Sorry about the novel-length post.

You guys have been soooo helpful on this. Even the bickering (which I have to admit, I sadistically enjoy). But even the bickering is really helping to polish some thoughts and ideas that have been going through my head since I got this gig.

I'm going to start a new thread about the things that are common to all types of animation and try to phrase it in a way that will promote cross-pollination and synthesis.

Thanks again all of you. I know that people have been putting their hearts into this full-force and I appreciate it. Hopefully it will translate well into my course.


If everyone would please let this post about Animation 101 sink now that would be great (leave it unlocked though in case someone comes back a year later and adds to it).

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ColorInAble
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Ganklin said:
quote:
i suppose the biggest and most important difference in being able to draw well for animation is that it has no limits
If this were true, the 1932 king Kong would have been hand drawn. The reason 3D has taken off so well in Hollywood is because with CGI 3D you can break one barrier that traditional animation has found very very difficult to break into, even with an 80 year head start, and that is photorealistic animation.

Yes, it can be done by hand, but note how Peter Jackson used 3D when he redid King Kong, he didn't get a bunch of hand animatiors to draw the VFX scenes...

And if I were to look at Hollywood as the yardstick, drawing is very important. But people who draw don't need animation skills, they need comic book skills (I recommend Wil Eisners Comics and Sequential Art, a book about drawing comics, but not about drawing).
Why?
Becasue now in Hollywood, the property goes directly from the comic book to the photo realistic 3D Film (any one see Sin City, or 300)?

When I say "Cheats" I'm talking anything that makes animation go faster. I know shooting 2's isn't really cheating, but when you go "A second is 24 drawings" and then you find a way that it's only 12 drawings, that's a great "Cheat"...

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Ganklin
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i am not talking about nor interested in photorealistic animation. nor am i interested in what hollywood thinks is best for the art form. hollyywood wants to automate the process and make everything as quick and as cheap as possible.

yes there are times and places for different techniques, and in the case of 1939 king kong the best use was stop motion to mix into a live action film. i also think th best place for mo-cap was used in the peter jackson's version of the film.

and i will bet the house that the animators even as far back as 1939 kong were artists and draftsmen first and foremost. in fact, willis o'brian, lead SFX then, was a cartoonist and a sculptor.

plus, i heard he was really good blender.

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Ganklin
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oops, he was really good WITH USING blender

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monkeydad
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Here's a Willis O'Brien drawing from a pitch for a King Kong vs. Frankenstein movie.  -
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Ganklin
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oh nice! was that done in illustrator you think?

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gahlord
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Here's a fun good-time-Charlie thinker post for you all. Please enjoy it and participate.

Executive (and not no suit) Summary

“Animation” contains many different forms of production. This topic exists to identify the principles, concepts, habits and so on that are common among them. What knowledge/skills does the Pixar animator share with Caroline Leaf? And Terry Gilliam? And the Huxleys? And Miyazaki Hayao? And you?

Conversely, it could be that some skills/concepts trend towards one or the other animated media/styles/disciplines* and not others. Please describe.

And even more conversely (we have three dimensions in this forum, if not the 5th): is animation a ghetto of all non-live-action cinematic arts? [ed. note: this is the “Collect $200 and pass go” response... you pansy]

Instructions:

1) Answer one or two or all of the questions above.

2) Use a list. It helps keeps the personal confrontations to a minimum.

3) Use commentary to clarify your list.

4) Email the topic-master (gahlord <at> mac dotte com) to clarify if you are shy.


At this point feel free to ignore everything following if prefer. But please perform a quick browse of “Topic ‘Rules’” please.

Version History
This version is the “first” itiration of this topic (many other topics on this board approach this topic).

Some Detail

As an outgrowth of my previous "Teaching Animation 101 at a small college" thread I am interested in hearing what people here think is important to know/understand/be-able-to-execute regardless of media.

To start with, some definitions:

I'm using the term "animation media/style" to mean the kind of animation:

  • 3D CGI (Maya/Lightwave/Blender/etc)
  • 3D tangible (Stop-motion/puppet animation/claymation®)
  • 2D CGI (Flash/AE/etc)
  • 2D Tangible (paper and pencil/cel/exposed-film-etching/etc)

and let's not forget our hybrids and other fun media:

  • pixilation (for what it's worth, I am spelling that correctly: "pixie-lation" is not a digital artifact): one-half live acting one-half stopmo
  • paper cut-out: one-half stop-mo one-half 2D tangible
  • sandpainting (c'mon when are they going to fess up and call it coffee grounds painting?)

Also... I hope there’s something I forgot or mis-categorized. If so, please email me off-board and I will include in the next update.

Topic "Rules"

Some very important things to consider as you converse with your peers (or “those rebel scum” if you prefer):

  • This topic is flexible. I will likely refine definitions, terms, concepts as the discussion goes on. As a result, now and again I will try to gather consensus around various topics. Once consensus has been reached I will start a new thread containing this thread, but starting with a “General Consensus” header (I don’t have “Edit top post” authority or I would keep it consolidated.
  • Lurkers who email me their thoughts (gahlord at thoughtfaucet dott com) can participate and still lurk (I won’t say anything about you when I post the question). Lurve the lurk.
  • Everyone here loves animation in some form or another, very likely some form that you think only qualifies as toilet-paper packaging. Please get drunk and respond to any perceived personal sleight in this thread.
  • Hey, the rest of you: when the above happens with the off-the-hook insultery or whatever, just let it go. And read on. Better yet: Post something totally unrelated to the insultery post but also on-topic.
  • The above bullet applies twice as much when I get drunk and post.

The End Note*

  • please email me OFF-BOARD: gahlord attt thoughtfaucet doyt com and comment on any of the above if you feel so inclined.
  • My definition for "animation media/style/discipline/technique" could use clarification. If you want to comment please use the email. I hope to arrive at acceptable definitions soon and remove this bullet point.
  • While you're at it, if you have a better replacement for “CGI” I would love it because we all know that the digitals don't generate that image unless we tell them how.

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bigshot
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I just posted an article related to this discussion. It's called...

The Training of a Golden Age Animator

It outlines the education of someone you probably don't know enough about- Carlo Vinci, an animator of over 50 years at Terrytoons and Hanna-Barbera. Vinci animated the dancing girls in the Mighty Mouse cartoons and animated an episode of the Flintstones by himself every six weeks.

You'll be surprised at his education.

See ya
Steve

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Charles
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My class got started last night for the fall semester at Cal State Northridge. I spent the session getting everyone up to date about school and class policies, general orientation, establishing the goals of the class, etc. Spent the entire second half of the session on intellectual property rights. Next session we draw.

Before I wrap up my involvement on this thread, I want to explain one more thing just to be clear. The reason why I no longer visit many animation forums and popular blogs is because of the past experiences I've had. Nothing I've ever said or done on AN about the animation community, or any individual (except Michael Eisner) or group (except animation executives), or the policies I established for the forums could justify the way I was treated when I participated at other sites. By artists and animation people no less. Many times the ongoing dailogue of ridicule and spitefullness was brought to my attention, so I'd login and try and talk to people there. The rudeness, maliciousness and meanness was beyond reason. It was pathological. And almost always from anonymous posters. What made it worse was the moderators didn't seem to care. One time I was chastised for addressing someone who was particularly vicious as "troll". They could call me names but I was warned when I addressed this person as troll.

So when this kind of stuff happened, I said okay, have a nice life, and completely cut off the site from my mind and daily experiences. When a high profile blogger publicly insists on the forums here to have their AN account closed, and has never practiced the most basic professional courtesy and linked to our site, I couldn't give a ratz ass what's going on at their blog. I can close my account there too.

As a result, I've found that life goes on! Whatever is happening in animation that's of interest or importance, it makes it here anyway, and this community is by far the best in the biz for discussion and comment.

Thanks for the interesting topic and good luck to all.

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bigshot
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I can totally relate. There's absolutely no place for insults and attacks in a discussion forum. It's important to keep the discussion on topic so the degree of signal to noise doesn't tip in the wrong direction. Disagreement is healthy. Disrespect isn't.

See ya
Steve

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Eric Hedman
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A lot of people think that their art or doing art can make them rich and solve their problems.
And when it doesn't, it makes them bitter.

Making art and animating it makes me happy.

The craft of it and following it helps me earn a living, but it isn't going to feed my soul the way being a social human being does....it's different.

Part of that is making peoples live better.

I am glad I had other jobs beside being an artist or animator. I find that the more life experience you have had outside of a hermitlike or cliquey artist existance, makes for a better character-rich human.

I keep learning that if I am writing more than 20 words....I should shut up and sit back and think of something better to say...or how to better say what I want to express.


end of line...

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KevinO
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I agree with you Eric 100%. Having other interests outside animation and other jobs before, during or even after does make animation more enjoyable to watch and do.

Bigshot: Good postings and loved the article on Carlo Vinci, amazing artist besides being an animator.

Charles: Good topic, even if it went off here and there. Good ideas to take with me when I move to the east coast soon, as teaching might be an option too.
There's always something interesting here on AN.

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bigshot
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Ohjeepers put a great comment in the post on Vinci...

quote:
It's so important for an artist to understand everything that they can about WHAT they are doing, and WHY they are doing it.

whether it's sculpture for a better understanding of mass and volume, or the the study and performance of music to better control basic principles like timing and the effect that Rhythm has on all action.

If you integrate all the creative aspects of your life, your painting can make you a better animator, and your animation can make you a better sculptor. That's living the life of an artist- not just putting in hours at a job.

See ya
Steve

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Ganklin
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bigshot, good quote and well put.

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bigshot
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quote:
gaylord, i think the most important concepts in animation are weight, timing, and spacing. these are basically the essence of good animation reguardless of medium i think.
I'll add contrasts, caricature based on observation and rhythm to that.

See ya
Steve

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toonedbob
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quote:
The only way an animator can protect himself against outsourcing is to have skills and talents that people in other countries don't have.
Not true. With all the great advice that the 100k Animation Course offers, this nugget is counterproductive to a student that needs to learn the reality of the biz.

There is no protection from outsourcing, because companies only care about the bottom line. Does this mean you shouldn't learn how to do things the best way? No - the more you know, the more opportunities you have.

The only protection from outsourcing is to produce it yourself.

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bigshot
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Here's two examples that prove the point...

A student decides he wants to draw in the "Anime" style. He learns all of the formulas used in Japanese animation and the production techniques involved in producing that kind of film. He produces his own film in that style. It doesn't matter how good it is, because he's never going to be able to compete against a whole industry in Japan set up to do the exact same thing.

Another student focuses on fundamental art skills. He develops and grows as an artist and develops a personal style that is unique to him. He makes a skillful film with a unique vision. People may imitate him, but they will only be able to imitate the surface elements, not the core of what makes his film unique. With each film, he can expand upon that and always be ahead of the pack.

Business skills are great. And they're important. But they aren't a substitute for creativity. In school, students need to learn the basics. No matter how good the school is, they will learn more about the business side of things by working in it for a few months than they did in four years of higher education. But they'll never get the opportunity to learn to draw on the job.

See ya
Steve

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tstevens
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Well...

I don't think there is any right way or wrong way, but I do know that schools can only teach you so much. It is true that if you have a solid foundation to build on you can go anywhere and do anything. However as Bob pointed out, outsourcing is a cold hard reality regardless of skill or even business acumen. And regarding the learning of business skills, that is something that you really don't learn much about until you have had to work to sell your services and ideas to people who may or may not want them. I have met very few "great" businessmen in this industry. Most of us are lucky if we can tolerate someone who doesn't have an inside knowledge of animation. We often get too close to the product to be able to look at it as a commodity. That is why so many artists are incapable of running the business end of things. And just for the record, learning the business is as hard as learning the art.

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toonedbob
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Case in point if he is making money off of his films then he is producing it himself ergo not worried about outsourcing. And while skills and fundamentals are necessary, a good foundation in this business is needed as well. It keeps newbies from falling prey to the producers who would take advantage of them.

There are slews of unique artists who get laid off all the time when in a working enviroment in favor of cheaper and faster. Many have a hard time in finding more work.

Hanna Barbera ,Jay Ward, Nickelodeon, Disney, etc. have all at some point participated in outsourcing. If you are an EMPLOYEE in this field you run the risk of your job being outsourced. Plain and simple.

I believe in trying to achieve the most skills in art an animation as you can. It opens the door to more possibilities. But I ain't gonna give a student false hope that just because he is unique and talented that his job is secure, that would be irresponsible for an inatrsuctor to do.

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bigshot
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OK. I get it. You misunderstood how I was phrasing it. I wasn't saying that core art skills would prevent one from being outsourced. I meant that creative jobs are less likely to be outsourced than technical ones. A student would do a lot better to study to draw and create animation in school than he would study computer programs and technical processes. Making films yourself is a good way to keep focused on the creative end of things too.

The business of animation isn't good no matter what you do. There are a LOT easier ways to make a living. Most of us who have made a career of it have stuck with it because we have a passion for the artform. Maybe that's good in a way. It weeds out the good-time-charlies looking to coast on through.

Outsourcing is certainly a fact of life, and we are going to have a hard time beating the price of work done halfway around the world. We need to be more skillful and creative, so we can continue to be competitive with overseas artists. To a student just starting out, that translates into core art and filmmaking skills.

See ya
Steve

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Eric Hedman
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At the end of Ratatouille there is a 100% non mocap graphic. Pride in such industry and craft is laudable...especially when you bring the results time and again.

I have heard no less than 5 people wishing they could find that on a black t-shirt.

I reccomend American Apparel ..... Atomic Monkey used them and their logo t-shirt XX is my favorite to wear....fits really well and made in America.

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http://www.radiodismuke.com
20's-30's music

Come see my Second Life Stuff
http://slurl.com/secondlife/Chilispoon/128/80/39

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Ganklin
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the outsourcing talk reminds me of my grandfather's kodak camera dated probably 1950-ish. he died before i was born so i never met the man, but when i used to visit my grandmom as a kid i used to love that camera. she said i could have it, but it stayed there until a few years ago when she passed away. i took the camera. when i was looking it over all these years later i was struck by the words: "made in america" on it.

it used to mean something. i feel it still does. i feel lucky that i've been a part of a few productions, while some small, pride themselves on the animation we do in-house and at home on freelance basis. nothing ground breaking, but there's pride in it.

personally, i always go back to when i was shooting under the oxberry in school while my classmates were using photoshop and after effects to composite. i'd have a 5 hour figure drawing class, take an hour to eat dinner, and then paint cells from 6PM to 6AM every friday night. i feel like i came away with a better understanding of the process as a whole and learned to plan ahead.

you can't learn to draw enough.

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http://fsummers.blogspot.com/
www.shamoozal.com

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ApeLad
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quote:
you can't learn to draw enough.
I've been reluctant to post in this thread since it's been all over the place, but I feel this line really sums it up nicely. Every animation student should have that tattooed on the back of their drawing hand on the first day of class.
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Charles
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Steve you say there are a lot easier ways to make a living, but I can think of a lot more ways that are harder. Yesterday a friend who does something else for a living mentioned that he wished he was doing what I do. And frankly I wouldn't want to do what he did for anything.

Working in a creative capacity in animation is a dream come true for most people. I've found that the ones who really don't like it and complain the most are artists who really want to work in comics or illustration, or artists who are working on a show in a capacity they don't like, or who let the studio environment get to them, or just have a bad attitude and negative disposition in general. Most of the folks I know are very happy working in the biz and wouldn't trade their careers. Those are the guys I know. They may be the exception but I don't think that's the case.

Some of my top students are making top dollar working in animation and I don't hear too many complaints from them about it. The one thing I do hear from a few is how they wish the studio politics weren't as much of a pervailing factor in their workplace but they've been prepared ahead of time to adapt to it. When they get in they know what to expect and as such handle it with a professional attitude.

Working in animation is a very appealing vocation for many people. That's why there's a continually growing interest to get into the industry.

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bigshot
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I was referring mainly to the difficulty of maintaining steady work, not the difficulty of the job itself. I've heard some of the top talents at the studios talk about long layoffs and paycuts in downturns. The only way to attack that problem from the trenches is to have independent projects to fall back on and a strong skill set to remain competitive.

See ya
Steve

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Ganklin
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i feel that a lot of charles says is true. there's always going to be aspects of any job that are distasteful. animation certainly has its share, and i think many people suffer from disillusionment when they get into a studio job and find that they are not going to be the ones calling all the shots all of the time. animation is a team sport.

layoffs are always going to be a part of the trade. i don't think that is going to change any time soon. bigshot's right that staying competative by keeping your core artistic skills up will always make you an attractive employee. plus being adaptive as charles puts it should be taught to students as well (im trying to get back on topic hah).

i wonder how gahlords class is going?

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http://fsummers.blogspot.com/
www.shamoozal.com

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Charles
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I'm with you on that bigshot. Independence helps strengthen the industry. That's been a mantra of AN since the beginning. I know you feel that way because you were at AN #1 on April 1, 1999. In fact, you were one of the very first to show up.

I hope you recall also that I featured Spumco as an example of independent success outside the studio system.

Snakebite was there and he was talking about MP3 technology when it was so new few of us were aware of it or had any idea what he was talking about. Broadband was on the horizon. That was an exciting day. A good, positive spirit when the times were challenging.

I had a phone call this week from someone who asked me if it's true that an adult can't learn fundamentals after they've passed the age of 24. I asked them where they heard this and they said from John K's blog.

Official disclaimer time - I am not attacking Spumco. I am merely asking for a verification and if so, if you yourself believe that this is true.

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