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» AnimationNation   » General Discussion   » Ratatouille > what'd yah think ? (Page 0)

 
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Author Topic: Ratatouille > what'd yah think ?
rdelgado
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I would respectfully disagree with you that the Incredibles was not an epic.

Ricardo Delgado

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Mr. Fun
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I agree, Ricardo. "The Incredibles" was clearly an epic movie.

Heard people talking about "Ratatouille" while standing in line at Starbucks this morning. Later, the staff of a local restaurant loved the film. I haven't heard this much chatter about an animated film since "The Lion King" some years ago.

Maybe this film won't make impressive numbers -- but it'll be remembered long after the other animated features have been forgotten.

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SoleilSmile
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Forgot about that one. I stand corrected.
I didn't like the Incredibles so much though( no wonder I forgot about it).It's a guy film to me. Nemo holds the place of favorites in my heart as far as Pixar films go.

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Semaj
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I wouldn't worry much about Underdog...

Everybody is going to be in Springfield thru August. [Wink]

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oogieboogie
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The Incredibles grabbed me and kept me the entire film, and is so re-watchable.

But Ratatouille! Amazing! The models, the animation, the lighting, the textures . Unbelievably real, yet definitely stylized. And the food - oh! So edible. The chopping of the onion, the flame from the pan! The crowds of rats, amazing.

I thought the story was a bit slow in places, and thought that kids might not follow the plot or the dialogue in some as well. I'm not sure why all the cooks left the restaurant except for thinking Linguine was nuts.

I didn't really see the drive behind the mean chef to hold onto his empire, except for ego, but he seemed to really concentrate on the success of the frozen line.

What part did Ratzenberger do?

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LooseToon
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Ratzenberger was the head waiter. I didn't pick up on it during first viewing myself. He put on a decent French accent!

And I can totally see Skinner wanting to hold on to his empire because he didn't own the empire yet. He was waiting for the deadline in the will to pass before the empire transferred to him.

And although I can never be as eloquent as some others here, put simply, I loved this movie!

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Pixel Pusher
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Hi Mr Fun-

I checked this post a couple of days ago and then just now. I clicked on page 2 to see the latest posts on the movie and "what'd you think?" to see
your post is at the top of page 2 reading:

"Pure crapola. Something that will probably make a ton of money.

Life ain't fair."

I finally figured that was a response to the post right before yours but at 1st I was like what is
he dogging "Ratatouille?"

[Smile]

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Jennifer Hachigian Jerrard
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[SPOILER]

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quote:
I'm not sure why all the cooks left the restaurant except for thinking Linguine was nuts.
My husband figured that they believed Linguini's story, but they could not work for a rat.

Maybe they did think he was nuts, though. Colette returned only after the cookbook cover reminded her of Gusteau's firm belief that "anyone can cook."

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[/SPOILER]

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Jason Thomas Campbell
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LOVED the film, makes me so want to drop everything and find anyway to be a part of that place.

A couple of other hidden gems in the film I picked up on today.
The mime from The Incredibles performing on the streets, and the make of Colette's motorcycle... Callahan, a little nod to Brian Dennehy's (Django, Remy's dad) auto parts company in Tommy Boy.

Loved every minute of it, kudos guys and gals, excellent work.

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Mr. Fun
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Oops! That usually happens with a page 2, Pixel Pusher.

Yeah, we were referring to the movie, "Underdog."

"Ratatouille" is simply a masterpiece.

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rdelgado
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Some of the camera movement was amazing, as were those shots with hundreds of rats at work in the kitchen,which was both funny and creepy at the same time, which was the whole point, which was why this was a great picture.

Ricardo Delgado


PS- Nemo was an epic too.

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SoleilSmile
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Alright, then Nemo is an epic that plays well on video.

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Pixel Pusher
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I just saw "Ratatouille" this 4th of July.
I loved it! Everything was great, in fact it
was a great story that I didn't really pay attention
to stuff like fx, fur, shaders, layout or anything else but I was eganged in the the film and the characters.

I was just in Paris last month if you never have been go while you have time,
it's an awsome place and the food is pretty good to;)

Great job Pixar, and that Bird guy Brad:) [thumbsup] [cheers] [bow] [Big Grin]

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Eric Hedman
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I'll say it again.
I forgot I was watching a 3D movie.

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Zach Baker
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Some of Ratatouille's shaders caught my eye. Here are five unbelievably good shaders, not counting the liquids, that I saw get some good face time in this movie:

1. French bread - WOW! The closeup of Remy behind a crusty and fluffy piece of baguette was amazing.

2. Rat whiskers - Perfect, like they had to be.

3. Metal surfaces - There were so many in this movie; yet they all still had character - rust, stains, abrasions. Lots of attention paid here.

4. Strawberries - overripe, juicy or kinda rotten, they were just glossy enough, just fleshy enough that you could know what they felt like. The strawberries seemed to come out better than the grapes, even though grapes were used for a story point.

5. Colette's leather jacket - leather is common but always different, so the trick is finding the right material look, and Colette's jacket looked just right.

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Rupert Piston
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I took the family to see it last Sunday instead of going downtown to the annual Hollister Rally. I hadn't though about it 'till now, but the theater had only about three or four other families in it. Would have been nice to hear more laughter.

We enjoyed it thoroughly, though I think my 2 1/2 year old was more interested in learning how to use the bathroom (3 times!) and I missed a few things in the process. I'll go back and catch the whole thing solo sometime soon.

My wife's sense of it is that it's a great film, but perhaps not for the really little guys, if only because it didn't hold our boy's attention the whole time.

But mom and dad thought it rocked.

Probably the most memorable moment for me was when time is compressed and we go back to a childhood moment through the ratatouille dish. This hit an emotional spot, maybe just in me, but certainly in Ego and I'm sure in other viewers. Storywise, I liked that, and I learned something about writing that way as well. Ithink the title was about that moment as much as it was a cute pun on rats.

My own little blog entry about ratatouille

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Map
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I saw Ratatouille the day it was released...
I LOVED IT! Best animated feature so far this year.
Hey after the film I did go to the Disney Store in Square One[Thats in Mississauga outside of Toronto] to get my free pin. I got Remy.
Can you buy the book Anyone can Cook? Cause I'm still looking for a husband. [Smile]
Hey notice there are few films out there that has cooking within the film.
Waitress
Ratatouille
That Catherine Zeta Jones film out in few weeks.

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bronnie
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I saw it the other day and was enthralled!
What a masterpiece!
Slight spoiler here:.
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Feel free to tell me I'm off base here,but
the ONLY part I found a trifle awkward was Remy's pulling of Linguini's hair in order to 'transfer' his cooking skills. The marionette thing didn't work for me as well as it might have, if perhaps,the various directions of the hair pulling had been an established/understood set of "codes" or "commands". I know.. the setup for that would probably have been pretty complicated..
Maybe I'm just being way too literal.
Nonethless, I truly found this film a gorgeous and fun treat in every way, and as we all agree, Brad and crew are to be congratulated heartily.
Makes my personal top three Pixar flicks-- along with Nemo and The Incredibles.
The acting is some of the best I've seen animated (in any dimension),the character designs, (as always with Pixar,)are top notch. Though their animal characters are always wonderfully appealing, Pixar continues to champion 3d human design/animation to new levels. Other studios have yet to come close.I also found the art direction and voice acting in this film impeccable. Plus I had no prob with the rat thing-- I've had rats as pets.. they rock. [Smile]

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Mr. Fun
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Thanks for those comments, Bronnie.

As animation story tellers, we're always walking that "tightrope" of being too literal -- or not literal enough. Brad had tough decisions to make, but I felt he made the right ones.

As I told my animation colleagues the other day -- go see it. The movie is flawless.

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Animation Co-op
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It's a good movie, but "flawless" is a big word. [Wink]
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katsat
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Potential spoiler:
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Bronnie, you might interested to know that the "marionette" part bothered Brad Bird, too, when he took over the job. I read in an interview (sorry, can't remember where) that he wasn't comfortable with the "marionette" idea that was already there, but couldn't resolve the issue in the time he had, so he had to go with it.

And I absolutely loved Ratatouille, too. It appealed to me on all levels -emotionally, aesthetically, humorously, technologically, viscerally. I especially loved the tactile quality of the rats - not just how fuzzy they were, but how it all related to their personalities and situations. Everything contributed to the story and emotion of the whole. It's the work of true genius and heart, and I just want to thank everyone involved for gifting us with this creation.

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bronnie
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Katsat--
Interesting indeed that Brad had struggled with the point I mentioned above.
Obviously no big deal though, as the movie is an absolute gem regardless.
You mention the effective capture of the rats' personalities. If anyone else on here has had pet rats as I have, you know that these intelligent little animals have very distinct personalities. Over the years, I've had six: Buffy, Missy, Ralph, Tony,Curly and Larry(sorry, no Moe). Each was different in temperament; some liked to play, others just liked to hang out, and though they were very gentle with me, they would, on occasion,fight with each other. You can tell how a rat is feeling-- it's in the eyes and the demeanor-- you can tell when they're happy, pissed,lonely, whatever. Where the film really captured this for me was how Remy and Linguini communicate without words..The acting there was lovely and fulfilled the purpose charmingly-- Good move on Brad's part to avoid 'interspecies conversation'.. No need for it, it would have been trite as hell.

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bronnie
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Ack-- I gotta back up there-- I meant that Remy communicates with Linguini without words.. Linguini, of course does talk to the rat.. Heck.. I used to talk to mine all the time.. If they'd talked back, I'd be a millionaire. [Wink]

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I am not young enough to know everything- Oscar Wilde

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Steve G
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The amazing thing to me is the film insisted on the realism of rats not being able to talk to humans, but instead opted for a rat to be able to control a human by pulling his hair.

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Methuselah
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quote:
The amazing thing to me is the film insisted on the realism of rats not being able to talk to humans, but instead opted for a rat to be able to control a human by pulling his hair.

Worked for me. [Wink]
But seriously-the film does have little holes and logical flaws in the story. The puppeteering thing in particular made me stop during the film and think "uh-uh" and I have a strong capacity for suspending disbelief.

But: it's immensely entertaining and finally just plain terrific entertainment with the occasional stutters. In the end they didn't matter. The good ideas and choices outweighed any weaknesses. Given the Frankensteinian job that had to be done to get the movie out it was a solid-gold miracle that it wound up the way it did. Or rather, a hand made, sweat-of-the-brow miracle. Everyone who contributed to it as it exists now deserves a big hand.

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Animation Co-op
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One of Pixar's "logic rules" is that animals don't talk in front of humans. However, Pixar does allow animals to communicate with humans gesturally, which makes the "no talkie" rule seem a bit silly. Sort of like when people write "f*ck". [Roll Eyes]
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Greg B
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Okay so I'm the one stick in the mud around here concerned with $$$. I just have a philosophy that if you're not making money, you're making a mistake.

I was waiting for the latest Potter film to guage the success of Ratatouille. All the years of studying marketing I have to.

What I was waiting for was what was Ratatouille going to do with the flurry of box office monsters that followed it at the box office. If Ratatouille was worth its soup it would do the ONE thing I was hoping for:

Stable growth.

Better yet:

Stable growth with upward spikes.

What I mean is no matter what new box office monster that came out, Transformers, Die Hard, Potter 5, Ratatouille has had this day after day steady income of around $5 million with spikes upward. That shows me the hard core Pixar fans and animation public that has to see the movie. Not only that but return folks who didn't catch all the action the first time out.

With all that's been thrown at it, $143 + million ain't something to sneeze at considering it's got legs and global box office to boot.

Sure it's not bowling in the dough faster than the bigger films but it's a steady consistency that is worthy of major note. Why? Because if it can do this good against the tidal wave of competition just think what it'll do when issued in less competitive time frames.

Lots of good watching Pixar's success.

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Mr. Fun
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Okay, "flawless" is a big word.

Taking top spot in a mid year report, Rotten Tomatoes reports that, according to their standards, the animated comedy Ratatouille is the best-reviewed film of 2007 thus far.

So, maybe not flawless -- but pretty damn good.

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Animation Co-op
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quote:
The amazing thing to me is the film insisted on the realism of rats not being able to talk to humans, but instead opted for a rat to be able to control a human by pulling his hair.
If any other rats see this film, we're all DOOMED! [Big Grin]
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rdelgado
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It's a very good story. You can take ANY story and pick at it until you find something you don't like.

Why did Luke, Han and Leia fly to Yavin when they knew that they were being tracked?

Why didn't Chief Brody and crew take Richard Dreyfuss NEW boat out instead of Robert Shaw's jalopy?

Why were the rats...american instead of french?

The marionette thing. Was it a stretch? Sure. But that kind of gag is the beauty of an animated feature. People would roll their eyes at a gag like that in live-action.

Ricardo Delgado

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Steve G
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I know what I'm going to say will piss off a few and probably eliminate any chance I may have of ever working for Pixar (like that was ever a possibilty).
Despite all the cheerleading that seems to come along with any Pixar release the one absolute truth that I can actually say concerning this film is that Brad Bird did a magnificent job of directing what was clearly a severly flawed project.
I found it reasonably entertaining - maybe a little more so than Shrek3 (but S3 was flawed as well), but not nearly as much as Toy Story or Brad's other two films and not nearly worthy of all the critical praise that has been heaped upon it. Even Cars was a better told story and I'm not a big fan of Cars (though I really liked Doc Hollywood;) ).
I could enumerate the reasons why I feel this way, but I suspect what I've said already is enough to engender enough hate towards me already.

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Inkan
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quote:
The amazing thing to me is the film insisted on the realism of rats not being able to talk to humans, but instead opted for a rat to be able to control a human by pulling his hair.
True, the film takes a realistic tone regarding the rats; no Cinderellas here happy to have her rodent friends do the chores. But the movie is already removed from reality in Remy's ability to understand Linguini's speech and communicate with him via pantomime. Not to mention Remy having cooking ability in the first place. The convincing interaction between Remy and Linguini made me open minded for more bends of reality. So I had no problem going along with the hair pulling. It was a good example of, I think the term is "Plausible impossible", Walt once talked about that? If someone pulls your hair, you may be startled. I bet there's some school of acupuncture out there that could correlate points on your head with muscles.

BTW: I have a question about the very end

MAJOR SPOILER!


Did Ego reveal Remy's identity in his review? And does everyone know that Remy is the head chef at Linguini's new restaurant? If not, who do they think is doing the cooking?

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Steve G
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The 'plausible implausable' would have been that since Remy could read and understand english (French?) then he could also talk to humans - he had just never tried before - maybe not nearly as entertaining, but a lot less disruptive to the world they created. If somehow there was some basis for pulling hair to control body parts (even with the body was asleep) then you could use that argument. It doesn't hold up here. The only plus that you could point to is it allowed for a few entertaining moments. As a major plot point it was a major faux pas.

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tstevens
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I thought the hair pulling gag was sort of an extended take on the brain surgery joke.

-The brain surgeon has a guys head cracked open and starts to fiddle around. The sugeon hits the spot where the guys leg involuntarilly starts kicking around.

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oogieboogie
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Talking to him wouldn't have worked out. Remy had to force Linguine to do things. There were major sections regarding this.

On a sort of related aside, at Siggraph a year or two ago, you could put on headphones at one exhibit that sent electrical charges into your inner ear and would throw you off balance, so you would move to compensate. Someone would steer you around.

Effectively remote controlling someone:
http://www.forbes.com/2005/08/04/technology-remote-control-humans_cx_lh_0804remotehuman.ht ml

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Steve G
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I love pretzel logic... [Wink]

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Paka
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I was "sold" on the "marionette" thing as soon as Linguini made that wry observation to himself...

"That surprisingly involunTARY..." *bangs into wall*

[Big Grin]

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knowledge
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Steve, I agree with your praise of what Brad was able to make out of this!

Saw it last night - very entertaining! loved many many moments in the film (e.g. pepperspray, childhood memory)

This films premise shows me that damn near anything can work if you work hard at it with a visionary and a great crew!

Lord knows what this would have looked like in the hands of say Don Bluth!

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TSM
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I didn't have any problems whatsoever with the Remy pantomime or the hair control stuff. The entire scene in Linguini's apartment was there to describe to the audience how the hair pulling works and to me was done very convincingly, especially the last shot when the bottle falls and Linguini/Remy catch it.

It's an animated film for cryin out loud. Part of our job is to do what can't be done in live action. Otherwise what's the point?

I am all for degrees of believability in film, but for those who are constantly harping about it in the minutest detail perhaps refuse to allow themselves to be swept away, which is what great stories and great characters will do -- if you let them.

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KevinO
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quote:
The marionette thing. Was it a stretch? Sure. But that kind of gag is the beauty of an animated feature. People would roll their eyes at a gag like that in live-action.
Then it's a good thing Sony or Warners didn't make it, or else it might've looked like Stuart Little or worse, Scooby Do or Back in Action. I think Brad and company did a great job and it was entertaining to watch.
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