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Author Topic: Chris Sanders leaving Disney?
Timbone
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Friend of mine sent this my way - I thought something like this would happen considering Sanders' reaction to not wanting to change anyting on American Dog...

I am not sure where the following text is from, please forgive me that.

“I am, by nature, an honest person,” Mr. Lasseter said. “I wear my emotions on my sleeve. There is no ‘behind closed doors’ with me. It’s the nature of Hollywood that there are the people in power and the people who tell them what they want them to hear. We choose to be honest and open.”

So much so that Mr. Lasseter established a “story trust” at Disney, a mirror of the “brain trust” at Pixar where directors and story editors criticize a movie’s flaws more than any filmgoer might. “They are not back-patting sessions,” Mr. Catmull said. The six-hour meeting about “Meet the Robinsons” was one such session. Mr. Anderson later called it “one of the hardest days of my life.”

Harder still for those animators who don’t adapt. Chris Sanders, a longtime Disney animator who was a director and writer of the hit “Lilo and Stitch,” had developed a movie called “American Dog,” the tale of a Hollywood dog star who gets lost in the desert. Last year Mr. Lasseter and directors from both Pixar and Disney attended two screenings of the movie and gave Mr. Sanders notes on how he might improve the story, Mr. Unkrich said. Mr. Sanders resisted the suggestions, Mr. Lasseter said. So in January he was replaced by another director.

Asked about the episode, Mr. Lasseter abruptly interrupted an interview to confer with publicists, asking “What can I say here?”

After a brief discussion Mr. Lasseter explained that Pixar often added or replaced a director if a film needed help. “Chris Sanders is extremely talented, but he couldn’t take it to the place it had to be,” he said carefully.

Mr. Sanders, who is negotiating his exit from Disney, declined to comment. “John doesn’t force his solutions on you,” said Brad Bird, who directed “The Incredibles” and is close to Mr. Lasseter. “But that doesn’t mean he is going to go quietly.”

Has anyone else heard anything? This is seriously a bummer to me. If Sanders is leaving, I wish him all the best, though I fear I won't see much of his art around anymore...

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monkeydad
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The text is from the New York Times article from last weekend. You can find a link to the article on that other animation website...
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eboles
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There's a number of interesting contradictions in that piece.

First it's
quote:
“I am, by nature, an honest person,” Mr. Lasseter said. “I wear my emotions on my sleeve. There is no ‘behind closed doors’ with me.
then it's

quote:
Asked about the episode, Mr. Lasseter abruptly interrupted an interview to confer with publicists, asking “What can I say here?”

And this is awkward
quote:
“John doesn’t force his solutions on you,” said Brad Bird, who directed “The Incredibles” and is close to Mr. Lasseter.
considering
quote:
Mr. Sanders resisted the suggestions, Mr. Lasseter said. So in January he was replaced by another director.
Hard to know what to make of it exactly. There've been a number of articles that haven't necessarily painted Lasseter in the best light regarding this situation. Clearly Lasseter has some radical plans for Disney. I remain optimistic, and hope he gets a decent shot at making all the changes he feels are necessary.
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Floyd Bishop
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I have no idea how this particular relationship works, or worked, but as with any job, you have a boss to answer to. That's the way it is.

Interestingly enough, this echoes something from Lasseter's own past:

quote:
I was so excited about the test, and I wanted to find a story that we could apply this technique to in a full-blown movie. A friend of mine had told me about a 40-page novella called "The Brave Little Toaster," by Thomas Disch. I've always loved animating inanimate objects, and this story had a lot of that. Tom Willhite liked the idea, too, and got us the rights to the story so we could pitch it to the animation studio along with our test clip.

When it came time to show the idea, I remember the head of the studio had only one question: "How much is this going to cost?" We said about the same as a regular animated feature. He replied, "I'm only interested in computer animation if it saves money or saves time." We found out later that others had poked holes in my idea before I had even pitched it.

In our enthusiasm, we had gone around some of my direct superiors, and I didn't realize how much of an enemy I had made of one of them. I mean, the studio head had made up his mind before we walked in. We could have shown him anything and he would have said the same thing.

Ten minutes after the studio head left the room I get a call from the superior who didn't like me, and he said, "Well, since it's not going to be made, your project at Disney is now complete. Your position is terminated, and your employment with Disney is now ended."

CNN article

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Eric Hedman
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I would love to see Chris do a more mature animated story. Not quite the more prurient Ralph Bakshi stuff, but something where his cute furry creatures and his Lava Hot Babes can exist side by side.

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Mr. Fun
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I was lucky enough to work with Chris on Disney's "Mulan" some years ago.

You're right. His babes are indeed lava hot. It would be cool to do a movie where they could be animated in all their glory.

I still have sketches Chris did back then. Wow! Good stuff!

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Graphiteman
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Gee, I'm just not reading what others seem to be reading between the lines in that article...which as a layperson, not close to the action, reads as fair to me.

Whether one's boss is just a bean-counter like Esiner was or someone from the creative trenches like Lassiter, a time will come- in fact, many times will come, when they will have to make an unpopular decision. The difference may be that the bean-counter's decision may be groping in the dark and making terrible decisions in the sincere effort to save a film. The boss from the creative trenches efforts is an attempt to save a film based on hands-on experience and a near flawless track record.

Do we really expect Lassiter in that position to allow artists to do whatever they want because he is one of them? That too would be irresponsible.

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Ben Burgess
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This is during the so called Pre-Eisner dark period era. Management communication with the animation department staff was gaurded in secrecy and there was a undisclosed protocal proceedure to adhure too.

An example of this would be in order to get your scene approved you had to be polite and have the person who gave you the scene go over it and they would put a clean sheet of animation paper over your drawings to be corrected. This process might go back and forth; never would you go to someone else to get the scene oked! To do any kind of end around strategy would leave you with no work to have during the production mysteriously.

What we need here are the names for the cast of characters in this Greek Tragedy.

Previously mentioned by the John Lasseter quote lets put the name of the studio head and supervisor down here.

Ron Miller, CEO and Ed Hansen, the Animation Dept. Supervisor. Ed Hansen quote, "Who would want to see an animated film about a toaster?" [lamer]

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knowledge
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graphiteman, Lasseter will have our respect if he makes a creative decision moreso than the previous non-artists that ran the place. I don't know where you read that by him being an artist meant that he will give artists free reign? I think we can be assured that his decisions will pass thru his 'artist' filter before he makes them. He is also surrounded by a group of respectable people that he can turn to for their advise before making any decisions. He has my vote of confidence. At the moment I think he is like any new President of the U.S. who has to deal with the mess that was already set in motion from the previous administration. It'll get cleaned up and a new era will begin.
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Lidenbrock
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I only hopes that the movie actually turns out to be better instead of worse.

I don't know how much from the article which is correct, but this is what it says:

http://animatedfilms.suite101.com/article.cfm/dreamworks_mk2_want_puss_in_boots

"Apparently there were several reasons for the change. Firstly, Lasseter wasn't a big fan of Lilo and Stitch, which meant he wasn't a fan of Sanders' artistic sensibilities. The second was that Sanders and Lasseter weren't getting along when it came to this new movie. Not only that, American Dog in its original form was going up against Toy Story 3. Guess who would lose in a situation like that?"

And "Lasseter decided to make changes. So Sanders was out and Williams is in. Henry is no longer a cute little brown dog but has become a white Alsatian with a brown lightning bolt running down his body (his name? Bolt, natch). Also, the Nevada desert (which was too close to the setting of Lasseter's Cars) is now the back streets of New York City.

In the new plot, Bolt is the star of a fictional television series called American Dog; a cross between Johnny Quest and James Bond. The only problem is that Bolt actually thinks that he is a super-powered canine and that his co-star Penny is really his friend, instead of being a 12-year-old actress paid to love him. However, this all changes when Bolt is accidentally shipped to NYC.

The dim-witted dog's new friends Mr. Mittens (actually a female cat: her owner's not too swift) and Rhino the hamster have to get Bolt back to Hollywood, and still in one piece. That last bit's important because Bolt still thinks he has super powers, which cause him to do crazy things.

Of course, halfway back to Hollywood, Bolt realizes that he's not really a super hero and that American Dog is just a TV show. Cue the shock and wailing.

Unfortunately this new plotline has a certain similarity to two movies from Lasseter's past: Buzz Lightyear's story arc from Toy Story (toy thinks he's really a super-hero) and Lightning McQueen from Cars (pampered race car must survive in the real world). All this after Lasseter shot down the whole Nevada desert angle in the original plotline."

To be honest, not everything Lasseter has come up with is equally entertaining. And myself, I liked Lilo & Stitch very much.

If you are using too much cold logic to change a movie to improve it, it could end up losing its heart.


And I hope that Chris Sanders can find another studio where he can use his talent to produce interesting animated movies.

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Greg B
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Is American Dog supposed to be CG or 2D?

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Nipplenuts McGurk
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After Cars, I'm not sure Lassetter should have so much pull over story.

Yeah. I said it.

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Mr. Fun
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"American Dog" is still on board as a CGI film from what I hear.

While we're on the subject, I can't help but be reminded of another Disney "crazy man" who shook things up at the studio when I was there many years ago. His name was Ward Kimball. Perhaps you've heard of him.

Anyway, Ward was known for going against the grain. Doing things his own way -- and even (gasp!) disagreeing and talking back to Walt Disney. All the old timers knew that Ward would eventually get slapped down by Walt -- and that day did come on the movie, "Babes in Toyland" when Ward was removed as director. Not that Ward cared all that much. The movie pretty much sucked anyway.

All I'm saying is, it's good to have a "nut case" around to push things in a different direction. It's good to have a director who has his own vision. It's good to have someone who dares to disagree with "Fearless Leader."

It's a good thing.

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Dan P.
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If I'm to judge from the new plotline for American Dog, I think Lasseter may have reacted badly by removing Sanders. Plus, why the heck would you remove a director from his own pet project? Either keep him on board or scrap the entire thing and move on. Seems simple enough.
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Greg B
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Well I hope they come to an agreement and get on with the project. As a fan it sounds exciting.

I just hope the story doesn't become formulaic and redundant.

New blood, new ideas, based on the foundations of successful storytelling always win out.

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alimator
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I'm sure I read an interview where Lasseter defended 2D animation by citing 'Mulan' and 'Lilo and Stitch' as good examples. This was years ago, before Eisner and Katzenberg proclaimed 2D dead. Maybe I dreamt it.

I have to say, American Dog as a premise always looked iffy (and still does), but I'd hate to see Sanders leave Disney. His style is wonderful.

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Eric Hedman
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Honestly....If Sanders could Captain something the way Chomet has, then we are in for a wild ride...
I want to see a very Un-Disney movie from Mr. Sanders.

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EustaceScrubb
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quote:
Honestly....If Sanders could Captain something the way Chomet has, then we are in for a wild ride...
Speaking of Sylvain Chomet :

London Times article on Sylvain Chomet's next animated film

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Joris
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quote:
After Cars, I'm not sure Lassetter should have so much pull over story.
agreed. Cars' story seemed so formularic that it became really boring to me. I saw the movie once and had a good time, but never cared to see it again or buy it on DVD. I can't deny I'm getting a bit annoyed by the Lasseter style, though it's a personal thng. I guess for Disney it's good to have one man leading according to the team according to his vision. You can build a stronger brand. Though other studios/distributors shouldn't be afraid to take on a different vision with their movies. Other visions can build other strong brands.

American Dog seemed interesting to me, as I really enjoyed Lilo and Stitch. But when people on this board say Sanders leaving Disney behind him is a good thing so he can let his creativity roam free, I hope they're right. Feature animation can go way beyond of what Disney has been doing with Lilo and Stitch, and I hope Sanders will find a way to do so.

Also, the article about Chomet's new feature is a really nice read! I'm looking forward to that movie already.

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tstevens
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I think it is interesting that there is quite a bit of press regarding Chris Sanders removal American Dog yet few people noticed when Brad Bird replaced Jan Pinkava on Ratatouille.

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Joris
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What I've understood from Pinkava's replacement is that he was more obsessed with the graphical look of the film rather than it's story.
But I've been thinking the same thing. I guess it's because both Brad Bird and Chris Sanders already proved themselves to be capable of making entertaining features with a heart. But who knows.. maybe if Lasseter was steering the ship earlier, Sanders wouldn't have even had the chance of proving himself with Lilo and Stitch. Many have claimed Lilo and Stitch to be very un-Disney anyway. This doesn't mean it's a bad movie, but that it doesnt fit with its parent brand. Concidering how Disney exploited the Stitch franchise while leaving the real strength of the movie behind, this might be true. Then again, a Themepark ride about a teenage girl raising her little agressive but sweet sister wouldn't make much sense anyway.

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Mr. Fun
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With the exception of industry insiders, few people knew Jan Pinkava. Chris on the other hand was fairly well known. Disney made a point of that back when the company was pushing "Lilo" and taking every opportunity to milk that property with television and DVD spinoffs.

So, I don't think you can really compare the two. Jan is a very talented guy, and it's always tough to remove a guy who did the early heavy lifting on a project. But, it's business after all. I like to kid with my pals who get directing gigs about this. I always remind them they can be booted out tomorrow -- so be prepared.

Directing feature films is not for the faint of heart. It helps to be a little crazy to do it well.

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ApeLad
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quote:
teenage girl raising her little agressive but sweet sister
Sorry for the brief derail, but was she supposed to be a teenager?!?
Shutting up now.

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Matt Wilson
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quote:
Many have claimed Lilo and Stitch to be very un-Disney anyway. This doesn't mean it's a bad movie, but that it doesnt fit with its parent brand.
Why does this even matter anymore? What is so bad about doing something different? Lilo & Stitch is the only original Disney feature that succeeded at the box office, so you'd think they would give the dude the benefit of the doubt instead of tossing him out for sticking to his guns.

I don't understand what's to protect anymore. The Disney mystique is gone. It's over. Nobody looks to Disney for the big theatrical event of the year. They're not registering a blip on the radar. This isn't a statement about the quality of their films, it's just a statement about their public perception. As far as most families are concerned, Disney means cheap videos for the kids, expensive theme park rides, and Raven Simone.

So I really don't see what is to lose by letting an artist do a film his way. Maybe it's a TV mentality vs a movie mentality, but I think that if a movie should fail or succeed, it should be because of the artist who created it, not because of something that someone above him changed. Especially if we're talking about throwing away 50-70% of a movie. If Sanders wasn't thrown out, he should have walked anyway. It's no longer his film, it's Lasseter's film. Tinker Bell is Lasseter's film. For better or worse.

All I can think is that if these movies do not perform well, or are not received well, that Lasseter had better own up to it. And if they do well, if the skeptics are wrong, then we'll gladly be wrong. But I remain a skeptic.

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Mr. Fun
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"Cheap videos for the kids, expensive theme park rides and Raven Simone." Yep, that pretty much nails it.

Of course, Disney has had success with "Pirates of the Caribbean," the one thing Walt would have thought was cool. Can they do the same with animation? Time will tell.

We're still recovering from Eisner's disastrous shut down of traditional animation. The damage from that wretched decision will be felt for years to come. Nothing like setting the house on fire when you decide to leave.

Thanks, Mikey.

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Greg B
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Jeez, it's only been a short time since Eisner got the boot and now the new guy everyone cheered on is getting the treatment. Heavy is the head that wears the crown.

Lilo and Stitch is one of the best family films of all time because it isn't just about blood but about character that binds a family. It's the most unconventional yet warm in an Addams Family way where everyone has their own idiosyncracies but together they're stronger.

We outsiders can't fathom what Lasseter is going through with this mega corporation. He's got more cattle to wrangle with the extra responsibility of an even larger, greedier stockholder base. Not only that but he's raising a family at the same time.

If Walt Disney were to come back I'd bet after his first few features and decisions he'd be getting the treatment too.

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Semaj
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Imagine if fans had more info of what was going on at Disney back in the 1960's. And they knew Bill Peet was behind 101 Dalmatians, among their other favorite films.

How do you think they would've responded when they learned why Peet left Disney? That Walt hated his treatment of The Jungle Book?

People then, and still today view Walt as a jerk, because of his relationship with his artists. But thankfully, that hasn't clouded the main perception of his repetoire. John Lassater seems to be going thru the same thing.

Greatness can't seem to be achieved without stepping on some toes.

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Mr. Fun
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Hey Semaj,

It was not unusual for Bill Peet and the "Old Man" to argue. They did it on a regular basis. It's just that on "Jungle Book," both stuck to their guns and couldn't find common ground. Peet later said he regretted leaving the way he did.

And no -- no one viewed Walt as a jerk because of his relationship with his artists. Walt wanted to do things his way. Hell, it was his company, after all.

Sure, most of us liked Bill's treatment of "The Jungle Book," but Walt thought the tone was too dark, so we changed it. No big deal.

In any case, the staff had only the highest respect for Walt Disney whether we went along with his decision or not.

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Jessie
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I think, the real jerks are the ones who view Walt as a jerk...

Let the chips fall where they may. If Sanders wanna leave then, so be it. Disney ain't exactly Hotel California to begin with...

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mojodesign
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Peet's departure is a sad story indeed. Maybe it was the fact that Bill Peet never saw Walt alive again that made him regret the way he left.

Mr. Fun, do you know if Walt ever tried to lure Bill Peet back to Disney? How do you let someone like that go so easily? Peet was the only guy that Walt trusted enough to take on as much responsibility on a story as he did.

It's tough. I know it must have been a VERY tough decision for Lasseter to take Chris Sanders off of the project. Those are the times when I don't envy people in those positions. They sure have a hard job to do sometimes.

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Mr. Fun
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As much as I respect The Old Maestro, Walt had a stubborn streak. I sincerely doubt Disney ever tried to entice Bill Peet to return to the studio. Keep in mind, Walt passed away about six months later.

Had the old man regained his health, things probably would have been different. Knowing Disney, he would never personally try to get Bill to return. More than likely he would have used one of his favorite producers or directors to beg Peet to change his mind. I don't see Walt apologizing for his actions -- but I do think he would have been happy to have his ace story guy back in house.

Walt was known to bounce more than a few guys off a movie if he wasn't satisfied. Sometimes, the poor director was never given a reason for his dismissal. I know of one guy personally Walt wanted fired. I felt sorry for the guy, (no names, please)but for some reason Walt just didn't like him.

But, hey -- it was his studio wasn't it?

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Joris
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quote:
Sorry for the brief derail, but was she supposed to be a teenager?!?
Shutting up now.

naah, not really. I must admit that I wasn't sure of the exact spelling of 'adolescent', and opted for the more save teenager instead, which would dramatize the whole thing. In either case, Nani was too young to raise a kid in 'normal Disney family circumstances'.

quote:
Why does this even matter anymore? What is so bad about doing something different? Lilo & Stitch is the only original Disney feature that succeeded at the box office, so you'd think they would give the dude the benefit of the doubt instead of tossing him out for sticking to his guns.
I don't say it should matter and I wish it didn't. Lilo and Stitch is one of my favourites animated features. Also, I'd like to disagree with those who say it doesn't belong to Disney, but I guess they have a point. Personally I'd rather see the Disney Image change than the movie, though, but that's not the case. Lasseter is doing what he thinks is right for Disney, and altough I'm not a huge fan of him, I think it's good for Disney their animation dept. is steered by one clear vision. And that's where I agree with Semaj:

quote:
People then, and still today view Walt as a jerk, because of his relationship with his artists. But thankfully, that hasn't clouded the main perception of his repetoire. John Lassater seems to be going thru the same thing.
Disney could have done many other great(er) things that weren't in line with Walt's vision. They had the capacities to do much more than what they did. However, their brand wouldn't have been so strong and simple, which became Disney's ultimate succes. For me it's really hard to decide what's better. A strong but unvaried identity steered by one man's vision, or a more mixed reportoire with bigger diversity in themes, but a less clear corporate brand. Disney has always being runned according to the first option, and since people want Disney to be just Disney, I guess they should.
Though, I must admit, I can't really make up my mind on this one. I'm just writing down certain thought patterns...

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Charles
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No line by liners guys, please. Quoting like this caused problems in the past that we would rather not deal with anymore. We're quite adamant about it and your cooperation and observance of this long standing policy is much appreciated. Thanks.

Chris Sanders and Dean DuBlois made an appearance one evening as guests of my school when Lilo and Stitch was first released in 2002. Their visit was arranged by the good hearted John Nevarez. I lost track of the photos from the event. If I find them I'll post them up.

Change isn't necessarily a bad thing. Wherever Chris Sanders winds up or whatever he does next, I think it'll be healthy for him, the group he'll be associated with and the industry and art in general.

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Mr. Fun
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It's a real shame because in my opinion Chris Sanders was perfect for modern day Disney. He could do really cute stuff that still had an edge. His "Lilo and Stitch" was sweet without ever becoming sappy.

I wonder what Walt would have thought of Stitch? Some might say the little critter was too mean. However, the Disney I knew loved that kind of thing. Heck, Walt scared the hell out of me when I was a kid. He always said, he didn't make movies for children.

Sure, Sanders can find a home at another studio. But, that's a shame because in my opinion, the guy was made for Disney.

However -- some days I'm not sure which Disney I'm talking about.

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Christian
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And Mickey started out as a real rascal so I don't think Walt would've had a problem with Stitch. And Stitch does change and become less mean throughout the movie.

I really like Lilo and Stitch so I hope it's not true that JL doesn't like it.

I have heard it postulated that if Joe Ranft was around the whole Chris Sanders/American Dog thing would've turned out different. I didn't even know Joe but it's easy for me to imagine that his take on the situation would not have been: "Let's fire Chris," but "Let's see what all of us, including Chris, can do to make this the best possible movie."

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Tobias A. Wolf
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You almost have to wonder whether or not it would have been better for Catmull and Lassetter to cancel every project WDFA had in production, layoff most of the staff, and start from scratch in building a studio when they filled their new roles. Although that certainly wouldn't have made them very popular, it seems like that's what their doing anyway but with a graduated reveal. Then again, I doubt they felt they needed to go this far with change at the start.

If true, it's sad to see Sanders leave. Maybe they thought his ideas and direction were too risky for the production budget? Which gets at the core problem with feature animation production in North America. Despite the skepticism of Digital production voiced here and in other places; it's true, you truly can accomplish more with fewer resources without sacrificing huge amounts of quality. I see it in my own work, as I'm sure others see it their own. Especially if you work under a low production budget and/or tight schedule.

Why not take advantage of this and establish a brand with low production budgets and insane deadlines. North American feature animation has never had such an outlet in any kind of sustainable fashion due to the prohibitive costs of it (outside the child audience). But it is time. Lucas seems to see it coming, why not get ahead of the curve here? Feature Animation has had such a narrow range to fail in for 70 years due to quality costs; am I the only one that see that ceiling being shattered?

There is only one Ralph Bakshi for a reason, and it wasn't just because of talent, but cost. Feature animation in North America needs a Roger Corman. The tech is there, the money is there, and I think the audience is there.

I know a lot of people here may disagree with me on many fronts, especially about the sacrifice of quality. Because this could bring down the rep of the medium. But the thing is with 3D production, it's never been put through the same kind of wringer that 2D went through.

The 2D production process went through decades of the tight production wringer by way of the theatrical distribution of shorts before anyone even attempted a feature film with big Hollywood capitol. The 3D process hasn't had that outside of advertising and a limited festival short market for the most part, then there is Pixar, DreamWorks, etc. That's a huge gulf. I for one think it would allow for a kind of apprentice/guild like system for artists to flow through, and that would be a huge boon for everybody. That gulf, above all else, is why 3D films are so expensive. The baby steps that led to this boom just haven't been experienced by most of the workforce.

Either invest in a process that invents efficiencies by nature, or accept the ever spiraling costs.

My .02¢

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Joris
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I wasn't aware quoting line by line is not allowed, I'm sorry for that. I just thought it would make my reply more structured.

I think Disney's problem with Lilo and Stitch doesn't really lie with the Stitch character, as they have had many sidekicks like him before, only this time it's a main character. But the deeper story line of the movie is quite uncommon, though IMO not impossible, ground for Disney, so I can imagine some think it's "un-disney", including Lasseter.

I too think it's nice if there would be more room to expirement with different kind of approaches to the medium for features, be it in less quality. The budgets for the box office hits from the big studios are just insane, and often they don't really seem to justify their respective products, especially not compared to the budgets at other places in the world. I don't think budget cuts would mean huge loses if quality, if you just organise it in the right way. But I guess it's really hard to do that the hollywood structure.

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Mr. Fun
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Tobias A. Wolf said something that intrigued me. We really should have a Roger Corman of animation. I would agree that the cost of producing animated features has gone through the roof. And why? Why does it have to cost a bajillion dollars to make a cartoon?

Even Disney produced "The Jungle Book" back in the sixties with a crew that was miniscule compared to today's production staffs. Plus, we only needed about four story guys, a dozen animators, and still got the whole thing done with no overtime.

Sure, costs have gone up -- but the process is still pretty much the same. Remember when CGI was suppose to reduced the cost of animated features? Well, that little dream never materialized, did it?

We will have more diversity in animated product once the cost of these films can be brought in line. Then again, you can hide an awful lot of stuff in an 80 million dollar budget, can't you?

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Lidenbrock
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Didn't The Scret of NIMH cost very little money compared to other projects of similar size? Today when there is no longer any need for cels, paint or camera, it should cost even less money (despite the inflation).
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Lee Crowe
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I remember hearing that year that "Lilo" cost much less to produce than "Finding Nemo", which came out the same summer...

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Look me up on http://IMDb.com.

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