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Author Topic: A 3D Overview from Asia to India
ClosetAni1
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Passage To Asia and India: A 3D Overview of 2003
Vamsi M. Ayyagari takes a look at what occurred in the 3D industry in Asia and India during 2003.
By Vamsi M. Ayyagari
[ Posted on January 21, 2004 ]

http://vfxworld.com/?sa=adv&code=319b255d&atype=articles&id=1977&page=1

In Asia, they say change is the only constant. And change is manifesting itself rapidly in the Asian 3D animation industry.
The period when Asian entities were deemed unreliable partners in 3D production now seems an epoch away. Such issues as inconsistencies in delivery and quality and Asians speaking little English are no longer valid.

But in the modern era of networked communications, it is not just electronic circuitry, but passion that is silently driving the force. Pure, raw passion that may soon shape modelers into sculptors, animators into actors and compositors into creators. A trend that started with outsourcing 2D work has now matured into the 3D arena over the entire continent.

As artistry taps computers to generate vivid imagery, Asian entities are out to etch their place on the global 3D animation map. We will track the roadmap of an industry that is all set to evolve as a premiere force in 3D animation production.

India has traversed a long path from a time when 3D was limited to pack shots and animation bits in advertisements.

Last year, Crest Communications, an animation house based in Bollywood capital Mumbai, created history by becoming the first Indian animation studio to successfully deliver a high-end 3D animation series: Jakers! The Adventures of Piggley Winks for its U.S. client, Mike Young Prods. Set in two different time periods, the show combines set design rich as oriental tapestry with spunky animation to discourse life’s values through entertaining tales of childhood high jinks. The success of the show is apparent by the fact that it was lapped up by different networks such as PBS Central in the U.S., ABC Australia, TVO Canada, TF1 France, RTE Ireland and SVT Sweden.

Other achievements that have done the studio proud include Kids Ten Commandments, a DTH production for the North American markets and Ollie that is set entirely underwater.
A.K. Madhavan, svp of Crest Communication, emphasized the challenge of creating underwater animation and lighting effects on the computer. But with every show, he believes Crest is raising the bar of 3D animation on television.

According to president Bill Dennis, “Combining 2D animation with 3D techniques has been a very interesting process. The 3D component, which comprises around a third of the series, is being used for spectacular effects, select backgrounds and crowd shots.”

Last year, Toonz completed and released its first-ever animated television series, Tenali Raman. It was a tremendous breakthrough for the entire Indian animation industry, since for the first time, a show with Indian content shot on an Indian budget resonated well in India, Asia and Europe.

Asian Tigers Roaring
Farther east, decades of exposure to animation techniques have helped studios rise up the value chain. Taipei-based CGCG won the Best Visual Effects of the 2003 DVD Exclusive Award for their brilliant work on the DVD movie Bionicle: The Mask of Light. No mean task considering it was the first time the studio produced a CG feature right from model building to animation and special effects to compositing. The highlight of the project was that it was achieved in a record time of 13 months, including pre-production design.
According to Wendy Yu, sales manager at CGCG, “Our clients, LEGO and Creative Capers, were so confident of the success of Bionicle, that CGCG was engaged immediately to produce the DVD sequel due for release in mid 2004.”

For Xcalibur, a popular TV series for European markets, CGCG overcame yet another creative hurdle by seamlessly combining motion capture with keyframe animation. Other breakthroughs include seamless integration of CG characters with live-action backgrounds for Japan’s biggest TV station, Nippon Television Network, and CG characters for a prime time Disney TV show.

Farther west in Singapore, Ng Boon Khee, the president and ceo of Silicon Illusions, focused his company’s efforts on building an efficient workflow and technology-driven pipeline. By adopting an intuitive digital asset management system, the company overcame geographical barriers to allow directors and producers to directly watch, control and execute their vision. Sounds normal except they were half way around the globe. The company is presently producing the third season of the acclaimed Canadian TV series, Monster by Mistake, which has picked up the Alliance for Children & TV Award and Gold Camera Award at the Chicago Film Festival.

Challenges
Quite ironically, the strength of the industry is also its weakness. While Asia remains a reservoir of natural talent, lack of trained manpower impedes growth plans.

Several executives suggest that the greatest challenge lies in emerging from a service to a content creation house. Skill sets need to be honed, especially in areas of character design, story development and storyboarding.

Todd Miller, managing director, AXN-ASIA, believes that while Asia is on the threshold of an animation production explosion, it is necessary to move up the value chain beyond execution to storytelling and character creation.

With increasing competition and clients looking at ways to mitigate production costs, the pressure may well be on overseas studios to provide more bang for the buck. It is here that many contend that the government can play a major role by facilitating access to easy finance.

Like any nascent venture, the Indian animation industry suffers from credibility issues. However, with a few Indian studios delivering on time, there has been some improvement in worldwide perceptions.

Trendy East
More and more Asian studios are likely to cash in on the rich repository of regional content and integrate the same with the inherent strengths of animation storytelling. This may help Asian studios not only rise up the value chain but also create and capture an entirely new market altogether.

The challenge lies in creating content that can cater not only to a market such as Greater China (Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, etc.) with 367 million tiny tots in China alone, but also an entirely diverse Indian community with a membership of 250 million children.
Yu also believes the key to success lies in creating styles that best bring out the regional uniqueness. A case in point would be Japan, which has created its own animation style in total contrast to Hollywood. Surprisingly, big budgeted Korean productions modeled after the “La Hollywood” style elicited very little market interest.

Dennis believes the success of Tenali has proved Indian studios can develop and produce Indian content with a cross-over appeal. Perhaps the middle path lies in wedging Asian stories with western production techniques. The widening demographic profile of Asian animation viewing and expression of CG in live-action genres of entertainment may necessitate just the same.

So does that mean Asia will cease to be a low-cost service provider? Not necessarily.

The economics of animation production coupled with global business necessities may drive the need for remote production, except we may expect more standardization in outsourcing procedures.

Back to the Future
In 2004, Asia is certainly animated.
Silicon Illusion’s is working on its first full-length CG feature production, Sing to the Dawn. Their efforts at creating an efficient workflow have secured them a niche North American clientele.

Crest is all set to work on Pet Aliens, a series that incorporates extensive traditional animation techniques into the 3D realm. Back in garden city Banglore, another animation studio, Jadoo Works, is executing a 26-hour CG animation project, Higgley Town Heroes, for San Francisco-based Wild Brain Inc.

In addition to the Bionicle sequel, CGCG will be working on a direct-to- video CG project for a leading U.S. toy company and a 3D feature, whose title cannot be disclosed at the moment.
But the most important development is that the experience has given the company an opportunity to create its own content. Interesting that after Tenali, Toonz Animation found itself designing characters for other studios apart from gaining additional revenues from ancillary rights.

Ironically, widespread piracy of animated videos in China has in reality turned out to be a highly effective marketing channel for periphery products. Merchandise sales have actually shot up due to the popularity of pirated animated videos. A clue for others to follow?

Many companies are also expected to take advantage of co-productions to shore up revenues. India has signed co-production deals with large animation producers in Canada and Italy, and is expected to benefit immensely.

Already the benefit of outsourcing 3D animation is witnessing a rollover into the gaming industry. Last year, several gaming studios popped up all over India. Given the countries pre-eminent position as a SW power, we may soon see a merging trend between two large talent pools.

Conclusion
The highlight of 2003 is that Asian studios have consistently risen up the value chain. Interestingly, executives in India, Singapore and the Far East believe it will ultimately be higher production values and not just low cost labor that will differentiate them from competition. Some, like India, are expected to benefit by its large English-speaking population and proficiency with technology. Others, like the Southeast Asian nations, will capitalize on their vast experience in animation.

The future may also see a battle of dimensions between 2D and 3D and the conflict of mediums between traditional and interactivity. Some may remain service providers, others may emerge as specialty studios and others may choose hybrid models.

In the meantime, artists will continuously try and weave magic on the computer canvas. A portrait, where a mouse substitutes a chisel, and a tablet replaces the brush.

Vamsi M. Ayyagari started his career at Riot Pictures, a Santa Monica-based visual effects house. As an exec producer at the overseas animation studio, he oversaw production for The Curly Tales of Piggley Winks and vfx for Koi Mil Gaya, India’s first sci-fi project. Presently, he is working as the Indian vfx producer for the Hollywood feature, A Sound of Thunder. He can be contacted via email at: vamsi_am@hotmail.com.


So its content creation they have their eyes on, eh?

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droosan
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Oyezz .. it was never not thus.

I worked on some CG television shows a few years back which were made entirely in the U.S. .. that work has already migrated almost completely to Asia.

I'm currently working on a CG feature film here in the U.S. .. but I have absolutely no illusions that they'll keep on being made here. [Frown]

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bronnie
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The above article is of no surprise to me;it merely illustrates all too clearly what has been
in the works for years now. My question is,
how will this outsourcing of 3d to India,(where,clearly, they are training very aggressively AND,it seems, successfully,) eventually effect the higher-end feature shops?
Some 3d animators I've spoken to at feature shops feel that it's no immediate threat, as long as the bar stays too high for India to reach. Do you think they are,in fact, immune to offshoring for quality control reasons? Or do you think that it will only be a matter of time before those gigs, too, will become another casualty? Given that possibility,( as the dark,jaded side of my inquiring mind emerges once again)is it even worth retraining? If the jobs are going, what would be the point of jumping onto a sinking ship?
Opinions, please.

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Twedzel
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Off shoring can affect any labour intensive job... quality is no barrier. That's why contingency plans are necessary as long as the current corperate climate exists.

The only advantage that CG has over it's classical brethren is that where as it is equally labour intensive, it takes a few trained operators working on highend computer systems rather than an army of lesser trained people (I'm not implying inbetweening and ink and paint are completly unskilled) require working in inexpensive mediums. Which erradicates alot of the benefit of a cheaper labour force. Which gives animators in North America and Europe a fighting chance. Then it becomes about operating budget and what is more convienent for the producers. What gives me alot of hope is the shere amount of great (and lets face it not so great)independant CGI being produced by indivuals or small groups then distributed over the net. It bodes well in keeping the artform alive no matter what happens to the industry.

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ClosetAni1
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I've chosen not to retrain, at least not in 3D. I've been working as a designer and a Flash animator for years now, but by God not as a Flash cartoon animator, that kind of work is just about gone. Unless the government steps in to stop this, this industry is dead.

I don't think feature studios are immune, but if they want to make good films people want to see, they'll stay away from it. Bronnie - you know better than anybody the hopelessness of trying to make western and eastern thinking work together and make a decent picture.

I think the interesting aspect of this article is that eastern studios are getting loftier ambitions. When they aren't willing to be a "gun-for-hire" anymore and they're making their own content start-to-finish, how will that change the current state of things?

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bronnie
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Hey Closet Ani,
IF, and I say IF, Asian studios were to create product/original content which would translate past Europe all the way west,then obviously there's the prospect of some even more serious/complicated competition issues.It then becomes about cheaper markets for content,not just production services, worldwide.
The problems we had with Korea on "King and I" (which was in production seven years ago),centered around drawing quality vs.drawing count,language/cultural barriers...We also had a tech deal with India that didn't pan out;but that was not the same outfit that bought into Rich Animation. Crest, who co-owns Rich, is the same outfit that animated "Jakers" for Mike Young,and,according to the article, they're making big enough strides in the that area
to attract quite a lot of business.

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ClosetAni1
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I would think the cultural barriers would continue to get in the way of foreign content's success in the west, even if language doesn't.

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tstevens
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Actually, there is a pretty good chance that if they do start creating original content they may come to the US and other foriegn countries to hire talent (Weta - although not Asian - has hired people from all around the world). You have to remember that original content on thier end really doesn't impact us negatively unless they happen to sell a better idea to a domestic purchaser.

Bronnie: as far as the re-tooling issue goes, there are still a ton of good jobs out there but the competition is definately stiffer. Ten years ago anyone who knew how to run Alias/Wavefront was hot. Not now. People with the skill sets (on top of having shear talent) aren't as common as you might think. In LA they might be a dime-a-dozen but not so much in the rest of the country.

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Bruce
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ClosetAni1 noted: "So its content creation they have their eyes on, eh?"

Well, in a word (or two), yes, of course. It's not as if this hasn't happened before; it's simply the next logical step to take if you want to expand your business -- stop working for other people and enjoy the profits to be derived from producing and distributing your own properties. That is not to say that it will succeed, though it may for some. Very few of the 2D job houses in Asia managed to survive their first self-generated projects in the 80s, for instance, and those that did soon fell back into the production-for-hire model. (Anybody remember Steve Hahn's "Starchaser: The Legend of Orin"?)

Breaking into and competing in the US market, 2D or 3D, is a difficult hurdle, and most of us who've been around for a while recognize a developing trend here -- the glut of animated product that has knocked the pins out from under the 2D market will soon (within, say, maybe three to five years) be overwhelming the 3D market as well. Some of that glut seems as if it will be originating in the Far East.

Based on what has happened before, we might want to predict the following: Pixar continues to produce a string of hits while other contenders try and either succeed modestly or fail altogether. Over time, Pixar grows into a much larger entity; a "creative executive" culture develops and takes over after the original team ages or moves on to other ventures; this new culture canibalizes the "classics" and starts outsourcing to India, Sri Lanka and the nascent animation industry on Tonga to produce a series of inferior sequels. At which point, Animation Nation posters start lamenting the death of 3D.

As for India or the Orient taking our jobs, I don't believe that either the city of Los Angeles or the country of the United States or the continent of North America or "we in the West" have any particular monoply on animation technique. We've simply produced a lot of animation, some of it good, some of it great, a lot of it forgetable, and now the rest of the world is entering the fray. They may not be able to produce stuff we like; but for a variety of reasons, the economics of production, augmented by technology, will continue to shift animation centers from region to region, and that will be going on for some time to come -- in part as a function of receiving government funding, as the article makes clear. Somehow, I sense that our government has other more pressing priorities at the moment than propping up the domestic animation industry.

This article, by the way, struck me as a load of marketing hyperbole, but it definitely points to a trend we need to take note of.

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talos72
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There is an interesting and related article in this February's Wired magazine. There the columnist interviews few of the coders in the growing software industry in India which is also receiving a good number of jobs in the tech sector lost in US. The funny thing is more than once the Indian programmers repeat the phrase "The only constant is change." Apparently it is becomming a national motto!

Regardless, we can blame India for the plight of jobs or we can put pressure on our own law-makers to help assess the economic damage the outsourcing has brought about and will continue to do so. I wish the Indian CG and software companies the best and hope they will bring some needed capital to one of the most impoverished parts of the world. However, I doubt such is the case with regards to outsourcing being able to improve Indian economy. The motives behind trading of jobs and outsourcing is very short-sighted and in the long run more will probably lose the game than win it, including the likes of India. Why? Because India is building an entire industry based on imported jobs. Those jobs will not last forever, and once gone the Indian companies best have contingency plans. Indeed, change would be the only constant then.

Who does make out in the end with all this "free trade" of jobs? The companies, no one else really-- Not even the cheap labor force.

In the wired article, there is a mention of how the American workers had to adjust with the export of blue-collard work in the 80's. They traded in the skills of manual labor for more knowledge-based work. Now we are seeing that even knowledge-based jobs(more white-collared, if we must use the vernacular) are losing out to overseas labor forces. So what is next? Where do you go from "knowledge"?

Again, I can not blame India, Korea or China for the export of jobs. I do, however, lay the blame on our lawmakers, economists, and representatives for not having the gusto to truly evaluate the consequences of this rampant filling of corporate pockets on the back of the public.

Outsourcing of jobs whether in animation or the tech sector is merely a symptom of a wider disease that afflicts the global society: a world more and more run like a playpin of a handfull of conglomerates and economic oligarchs.
It is for them that the wars are fought (economically and militarily), and it is for them that we sacrifice our livelihood.

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[edited for spelling]

[ January 28, 2004, 11:03 PM: Message edited by: Mod Too ]

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unionrep
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It's a global economy. For live action, for animation, for video games.

My own view is, work will be done everywhere. But it won't all migrate to Asia and India for several reasons: producers will lose control, in high-end features saving a million or three is not the overriding issue, and talent pools will continue to be important.

I mean, consider car manufacturing. If labor costs were the only issue, every car factory would be located in Nicaragua, yet 80% of the cars that we drive -- from Honda Civics to Buicks to Mercedes SUVs -- are stapled together in the United States and Canada.

Now why is this? Maybe because ports, infrastructure (airports, railroads and freeways) and the quality of the workforce are still important.

We're not dealing with a zero sum game here.

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talos72
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unionrep, you make some good points. However, with ever evolving technology, it is much easier to send and receive electronic files than it is to deal with autopart assembly. It is easier to set up an FTP system for sending rough animation cuts back to the producers and executives. Maybe that is what many are banking on. Though another factor may be that of a cultural divide. Aesthetic sensibilities of North American artists may not be the same as that of an Indian animator, not that one is better but that they are different. Maybe that could play a part.

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bronnie
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Quoting Talos:
"Again, I can not blame India, Korea or China for the export of jobs. I do, however, lay the blame on our lawmakers, economists, and representatives for not having the gusto to truly evaluate the consequences of this rampant filling of corporate pockets on the back of the public."

Well said Talos! Could not agree more!
[thumbsup]
However, I would not look for a change anytime soon unless we change administrations! Bush does not give a rat's ass about the situation as long as the corporate sector continues to profit.

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Ray Pointer
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The funny thing is that people seem to forget that India is in Asia, too.

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Mod Too
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Also the fact that by Asian, most people assume only South East Asian. Technically, anyone from the middle and near east is also Asian. Matter of semantics. [Wink]
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ClosetAni1
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Bruce - very good points as always. One thing: you say our government has bigger issues to worry about than propping up domestic animation, absolutely true. And if it were just animation jobs we were talking about, I'd agree that we should all just be taking our lumps, that's the way it goes. But when my friends are temping with molecular engineers and programmers that can't find work, this is clearly more than an animation problem. I used to work for IBM: they're creating 15000 new jobs next year. Only 4500 will be offered to Americans, while 3000 current domestic jobs will be shipped overseas. Exactly what do we tell our kids to go to school to do when something as highly skilled as programming isn't viable anymore?

Our biggest problem isn't that the Republicans aren't taking the issue seriously or the Democrats aren't addressing it, but that NO ONE is paying attention. This epidemic is barely making the news. The expectations last quarter for job growth were staggeringly higher than what they got and everybody is wondering why. I think the existence of a bill that protects federal jobs only proves that Washington politicians only know how to protect themselves.

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Augusto
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Outsourcing work to cheap labor is not an animation issue, as pointed out before is an issue for most workers in this country.

I work for a very big corporation, and luckly I haven't been outsourced (yet), but we have moved massive amounts of jobs overseas, while laying off staff here. During the boom in our industry (let's just say it's Energy related) we were ok with our manufacturing plants, but now they are gone.

We have moved all corporate support to India, and have moved research centers there and to other parts of Asia.

The billing department is no longer in the US, that's done in India too.

In the meantime, many in the US have to put up with the indignity of training H1-B and L1 visa replacements here in the US. We're replacing radiologists with offshore counterparts, and pretty soon MRI scans will be analysed offshore too.

The issue is starting to get play in the media, it's mentioned almost every day on CNN's Lou Dobbs program, and I have heard Hardball's Chris Matthews talk about it.

As far as presidential candidates, John Kerry is said to come out with an offcial statement on this after he mentioned this in his victory speech in NH

"shut down every loophole, every incentive, every reward that goes to some Benedict Arnold CEO or company that take the jobs overseas and stick Americans with the bill."

We'll see, this is going to be a big election issue.

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ClosetAni1
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That's interesting... what incentives/loopholes are there though for outsourcing other than just profit from cheap labor?

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Corn Fed
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The solution to outsourcing, if not simple, is at least somewhat straightforward. Businesses that choose to do their manufacturing in the United States should be given meaningful tax breaks--an incentive which is not retaliatory against other nations and trade like tarriffs would be. And yes, in this context, animation and live-action jobs should be considered "manufacturing" since, after all, we are producing the product in much the same way as far as business is concerned.

Revenue lost to tax breaks would be more than made up for with the revenue given to the workers--who in turn will spend it on more consumer goods. After all, laid-off skilled workers won't be buying any big-screen TV's when they're languishing at Wal-Mart.

And yes, as a liberal, I would even be willing to agree to spending cuts in social programs in order to finance properly-enforced tax breaks to these home-grown businesses.

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Augusto
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> That's interesting... what incentives/loopholes are there though for outsourcing other than just profit from cheap labor?

Cheap labor is it, that's all the incentive needed.

What loopholes? Well, for one H1B visas are being abused since there is no shortage of workers in the US. However, that's getting more and more regulated. Voila, now there's the L1 Visa, were they can bring cheap labor onshore, but not pay taxes (or much taxes) as the low pay the worker gets is classified as mostly living expenses. Unlike H1B, L1 visas don't have restrictions on the employer as to the number of employees with them. It's a godsend to corporate america.

So not only do some of us have to worry about being replaced halfway around the world, many have to worry about being replaced right here. I don't know about the benefits the L1s get, but I hear they are much lower than what we have in this country.

As for offshoring, a CEO making 5, 6, 10 or more million dollars can save lots of money not only on salary, but on benefits. Think about it, no pesky healthcare, no OSHA regulations, no lawyers bugging you about workers condidtions.

This thing is getting so bad that I've heard there's a company that is going to try to make money by "inshoring" 3rd world nurses that passed state certifications to the US. Are these nurses being imported because they are better than their US counterparts? Of course not, altough some might be, the main reason is they are cheaper labor. That's all.

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Twedzel
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With the current corperate/political climate it will be extremely difficult to change laws concerning outsourcing. There would be such a strong lobby from the business sector that government would buckle quite easily. They are too intertwined right now. That most of the big corperations are multinational makes it even more difficult to reign in their actions... weakening governments control further. Big money buys bigger votes, it's one way that the corperate machine is actually eroding democracy.
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ClosetAni1
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Thank you so much Augustus for the lesson in visas... I did some looking around and found this article from a Seimens programmer who was laid off and forced train his replacement because of L1 Visas:

http://www.aila.org/contentViewer.aspx?bc=9,576,3366,3375

Here's a quote regarding something that hadn't even occurred to me:
"What is happening here? In a time when our national security is paramount, we are making ourselves dependent on third world nations for our computer technology. We are giving these countries the ability to access, modify and break the very computer systems that run the US economic infrastructure." [Eek!]

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Greg B
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Oh for the luvva Mike!!!

I told you guys about this umpteen months ago if not years ago!

Get ready for the big ass wave of CG stuff from Asia.

Only thing is, do WE the biggest consumers on Earth WANT what they have to offer hence, the 'content' question.

I suspect, no I guarantee that 90% or more of all CG animation will be done in Asia by 2006. We creators have no choice but to outsource which I don't condemn, but we must outsource with 'responsibility' and to make sure the money and jobs go to the peope NOT the gangsters.

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Bruce
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ClosetAni1 wrote: "Our biggest problem isn't that the Republicans aren't taking the issue seriously or the Democrats aren't addressing it, but that NO ONE is paying attention."

I couldn't agree more, both as to the scope of the problem and its devastating economic and social repercussions. And if you want to know why no one is paying attention, just look at who is providing the bulk of financing for the next round of political campaigning -- on both sides of the aisle. Our elected representatives are being paid to not pay attention. I think there may be some noises made about this during the upcoming presidential campaign, but little meaningful action proposed or taken. Unless, of course, a lot of people can work up some real anger about the situation. Animators are just small voices in a crowd, but that crowd is growing.

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ClosetAni1
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Right Bruce, I'm thinking the same thing. A little talk, a lot of nothing.

Greg - I've been on this board for four years, so obviously an article like this is not a surprise. I do still believe its worth passing around. Outsource responsibly? Please outline that, it's hard to picture.

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bronnie
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Quoting Bruce:
"Unless, of course, a lot of people can work up some real anger about the situation. Animators are just small voices in a crowd, but that crowd is growing."
Lest we forget that we, as artists and animators have the collective talent to express that anger through our art!Just imagine what we could do,for example (maybe through a Co-op like Kevin G's)with a simple Flash cartoon posted on the internet!It could be ironic, poignant, funny,a little sick..lots of possiblities! If it is time to take a stand against what's happening not only to us, but to millions,perhaps we can join forces creatively to make a statement that WILL get noticed!

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I am not young enough to know everything- Oscar Wilde

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Greg B
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Closetan1

For the past 5 years or more, family and friends throughout Asia, Russia, have been telling and showing me and bragging about the amount of CG they've invested in and are attempting to flood the market with. We're not talking some piecemeal operation here. Unfortunately I can't give out details til after products are finished. There were however some 'problems' as CG like 2D requires skills. The attractive U.S. consumer base is what's spurred it on. Some of the stuff is Pixar quality but a rare, rare bit.

I guess what was attempted was the old, " the look is hot, let's hack it out " mentality. If you were at the MIPCOM you'ld know what I mean.

That gap however is getting smaller, quick.

Fortunately, 'content' is still king, quality too. In the long run however as we debate this technical and aesthetic branch, guess what's waiting round the corner?....

New technologies that'll make CG look like Clutch Cargo on crack. Or hadn't you all kept up on what Dr. Jin and her colleagues have been up to. Oh, yeah, that's right I think they're now at the award stage having invented the 6th state of matter allowing for quantum computer memory advances.

Just think what'll happen in 5 years when these hit the shelves.

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